Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington
Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington
Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington
Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington

Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington

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Wroe, Richard. A Sermon at the Funeral Of the Right Honourable Henry, Earl of Warrington, Baron Delamer of Dunham-Massy, Lord Lieutenant of the County-Palatine of Chester; and one of the Lords of Their Majesties most Honorable Privy Council; Preached at Bowden in Chester. London: Printed for A. and J. Churchill, at the Black Swan in Pater-Noster-Row, 1694. [5976]

Removed, 7 1/2 x 6 inches, includes the half title which has some soil, (vi.), 26 pp. Good.

ESTC R12138; Wing W3728. Imprimatur: Ra. Barker on verso of the half title.

A sermon on the text Ecclesiastes 2:3 by Rev Richard Wroe (1641-1717), warden of Manchester College, noted by his contemporaries for his eloquence. The subject, Henry, Earl of Warrington, was instrumental in his obtaining a royal mandate for the presentation of a fellowship at the college of Manchester in 1672. At the time of this sermon he was vicar of Garstang, Lancashire.

Henry Booth, 1st Earl of Warrington

Henry Booth, 1st Earl of Warrington (1652-1694), Member of Parliament, Privy Councillor, supporter of William of Orange during the Revolution of 1688, for whom he raised an army in Cheshire in support. There is a monument to him in the Dunham Chancel of the Church of Bowdon which reads,

"Beneath lieth the body of the right hon'ble Henry Booth, earl of Warrington, and baron Delamer of Dunham Massey, a person of unblemished honour, impartial justice, strict integrity, an illustrious example of steady and unalterable adherence to the liberties and properties of his country in the worst of times, rejecting all offers to allure, and despising all dangers to deter him therefrom, for which he was thrice committed close prisoner to the Tower of London, and at length tried for his life upon a false accusation of high treason, from which he was unanimously acquitted by his peers, on 14 January, MDCLXXX V/VI which day he afterwards annually commemorated by acts of devotion and charity: in the year MDCLXXXVIII he greatly signalised himself at the Revolution, on behalf of the protestant religion and the rights of the nation, without mixture of self-interest, preferring the good of his country to the favour of the prince who then ascended the throne; and having served his generation according to the will of God was gathered to his fathers in peace, on the 2d of January, 169¾, in the XLIId year of his age, whose mortal part was here entombed on the same memorable day on which eight years before his trial had been."