Skinner, Otis A. Letters to Rev. B. Stow, R. H. Neale, and R. W. Cushman, on Modern Revivals
Skinner, Otis A. Letters to Rev. B. Stow, R. H. Neale, and R. W. Cushman, on Modern Revivals
Skinner, Otis A. Letters to Rev. B. Stow, R. H. Neale, and R. W. Cushman, on Modern Revivals

Skinner, Otis A. Letters to Rev. B. Stow, R. H. Neale, and R. W. Cushman, on Modern Revivals

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Skinner, Otis A. Letters to Rev. B. Stow, R. H. Neale, and R. W. Cushman, on Modern Revivals. Boston: Abel Tomkins, 1842. First Edition.

Paper-covered spine with printed paper over boards, title to front "Letters addressed to...on the Knapp Excitement." Spine appears to have been reglued at some point, covers are worn with rounded corners, book is a bit cocked. 5 x 7 1/2 inches, several inscriptions, seller's notes, price on the front end papers. 1878 Boston public library stamps on tp and on one page of text. 144 pp. Fair. Hardcover.  [4273] 

"B. Stow" of the title is Baron Stowe.  

A push-back against accusations made by Knapp in the Boston revival. Skinner takes umbrage at many of the examples and anecdotes that Knapp used that belittled the religion of those not participating in his revival.

Otis Ainsworth Skinner (1807-1861), started his career as a teacher, in 1826 became a Universalist minister. He edited religious periodicals and was considered an effective worker in temperance, education, and other reforms. He served as president of Lombard University in Galesburg, Illinois.

"The following work was written from a deep sense of duty. The author was almost daily assailed, during the revival which called it forth, in a personal and exceedingly abusive manner. He was denounced as an enemy to God, and was repeatedly charged with preaching a doctrine he knew to be false. His ministering brethren, and all liberal Christians, were assailed in the same spirit; and their opposition to the revival was called opposition to God. They were repeatedly denounced as infidels, and doomed to hell...The author, therefore, speaks in self-defence...He is a friend of revivals, but not of modern revivals." - from the Preface.

No. 4962 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. "In opposition to the 1842 work in Boston."