[Fugitive Slave Law] Barnes, Albert. 1861 Sermon, Doeg the Edomite, the Informer
[Fugitive Slave Law] Barnes, Albert. 1861 Sermon, Doeg the Edomite, the Informer

[Fugitive Slave Law] Barnes, Albert. 1861 Sermon, Doeg the Edomite, the Informer

Regular price
$200.00
Sale price
$200.00
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Barnes, Albert. Doeg, the Edomite; or, The Informer. A Lecture on the Fifty-second Psalm, delivered in the First Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia, January 6, 1861. Philadelphia: "Not Published". Printed by Henry B. Ashmead, 1861. First Edition. [9147]

Printed wrapper, "Albert Barnes" in pencil top front, but does not appear to be his autograph. 9 x 5 3/4 inches, 46 clean pp. Very good. Pamphlet.

The author decided to print the lecture that he delivered on Doeg the Edomite, for rumors of it were circulating, and he wanted people to have in writing to compare to what they were hearing. The controversial aspect was that Barnes touched upon the Fugitive Slave Act, not in name, but in obvious comparison (the footnotes do refer to it by name). He compares their fugitive state to Protestants in Europe who were persecuted and had to flee to America.

"There is a law in this land on the subject here referred to, which cannot be executed. It is against the moral sense - the conscience of mankind, and such a law cannot be carried out. And believing, as I do, that the principles laid down in the texts of Scripture which I have quoted, are binding on the conscience, if a man should come to me as a fugitive from oppressors anywhere, I would treat him precisely as I would desire that my own son should be treated in a similar case, and as I would treat my brother. He should find in me a helper and a sympathizing friend."

Seven pages of footnotes follow explaining the Fugitive Slave Law, claiming that it is a Federal, not a State or personal obligation. Barnes states that he does not promote an open organized resistance to the law, but that he is expressing what he believes that his own, personal response should be if confronted with a fugitive.

Albert Barnes (1798-1870), b. at Rome, N.Y., “one of the most prominent theologians of the Presbyterian Church…He studied at Hamilton College with the view to becoming a lawyer, but the Christian experiences he had there induced him to give up his fondly cherished plan for the work of the ministry; and upon graduating in 1820 he pursued a four years’ course of theological study at Princeton, N.J.” – M’Clintock & Strong. Barnes pastored two churches in New Jersey before accepting the call in 1830 to the First Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, where he remained until his death. He was a strong advocate of the abolition of slavery, a friend to the poor, and a popular preacher and commentator. Some of his views alarmed the more conservative Presbyterians, and Barnes was a key figure in the “New Light” controversies. His commentary on the Bible remains popular to this day.