Cox. Quakerism Not Christianity: or, Reasons for Renoucing the Doctrine of Friends
Cox. Quakerism Not Christianity: or, Reasons for Renoucing the Doctrine of Friends
Cox. Quakerism Not Christianity: or, Reasons for Renoucing the Doctrine of Friends

Cox. Quakerism Not Christianity: or, Reasons for Renoucing the Doctrine of Friends

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Cox, Samuel Hanson. Quakerism Not Christianity: or, Reasons for Renoucing the Doctrine of Friends; In Three Parts. New-York & Boston: Printed by D. Fanshaw | Sold by Jonathan Leavitt, 182 Broadway, New-York; and Crocker & Brewster, 47 Washington-St., Boston, 1833. First Edition. [8403]

Plain teal boards with a printed paper title label to spine, 6 x 9 1/4 inches, old blotchy stains, front with some rippling to the cloth. Large author's inscription inside front, "J. B. Falt (?), Esqr. with the fraternal regards of the author. London, Sep. 26, 1833." 686 pp., untrimmed deckled edges, foxing of varying darkness, tight. A very good copy in a publisher's binding. Hardcover.

Dr. Cox was in London in 1833, where he spoke at the anniversary meeting of the British and Foreign Bible Society. The name in the inscription is difficult to read, but with more research of the attendees of that meeting one could probably identify the person to whom this volume was inscribed.

"Let it be remembered that principles not persons are here assailed; the SYSTEM, not purposely the INDIVIDUALS who hold, more than those who deny it. The system is viewed mainly in its RELIGIOUS aspect only, and contrasted with the system of the scriptures; and thence pronounced to be FUNDAMENTALLY ERRONEOUS." - Preface.

Samuel Hanson Cox, D.D., LL.D., (1793- b. Leesville, New Jersey; d. Bronxville, New York. After he had commenced studying law, he came to the conclusion that God had called him to the work of the ministry, and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New York, October, 1816, and ordained by the same body, July 1st, 1817. In 1820 he became pastor of the Laight Street Presbyterian Church in the city of New York. In 1834 he removed to Auburn, N.Y., and during the next two years was professor of Sacred Rhetoric in the Theological Seminary at Auburn. In 1837 he accepted a call to the First Church, Brooklyn, N.Y., of which he continued to be pastor till 1854, when he was obliged, by loss of voice, to desist from public speaking. Subsequently he was president of the Ingham University for several years.  Dr. Cox presided as moderator of the New School General Assembly in 1846, and was one of the originators of the New York Observer, and a valuable contributor. – see Nevin, Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian Church (1884).

Cox was instrumental in the foundation of the University of the City of New York, and was for many years professor of ecclesiastical history in the Union Theological Seminary of New York, and also presided for a time over the Female College at LeRoy. He retired for a time to “a pleasant property at Owego, Tioga Co., N.Y.," and spent the last years of his life in retirement in Westchester County.  - Summarized from McClintock & Strong.  (8403)