Young, Jacob. Autobiography of a Pioneer; or, The Nativity, Experience, Travels, and Ministerial Labors of Rev. Jacob Young
Young, Jacob. Autobiography of a Pioneer; or, The Nativity, Experience, Travels, and Ministerial Labors of Rev. Jacob Young
Young, Jacob. Autobiography of a Pioneer; or, The Nativity, Experience, Travels, and Ministerial Labors of Rev. Jacob Young

Young, Jacob. Autobiography of a Pioneer; or, The Nativity, Experience, Travels, and Ministerial Labors of Rev. Jacob Young

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Young, Jacob. Autobiography of a Pioneer; or, The Nativity, Experience, Travels, and Ministerial Labors of Rev. Jacob Young; with Incidents, Observations, and Reflections. Cincinnati: Cranston and Curts, (1857).

Light green cloth, worn at the spine ends & corners, binding is tight but scuffed. 5 1/4 x 7 1/2 inches, several former owners names/stamps on front end papers. 528 clean and unmarked pp. Date taken from Preface; probably a later printing. Good. Hardcover.  [4058] 

Running title: "Fifty Years in the Itinerancy."

No. 5955 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. "Born and reared on the western frontier, Jacob Young spent more than fifty years as a Methodist itinerant. Although he possessed little formal education, he spared no pains in acquiring the necessary skills and knowledge required for success in his type of ministry. His service for Christ began about the time of the great revival in the West (1800) and much of that which characterized the revival and made it a thing of wonder, also characterized the zealous ministry of this fervent preacher."

Jacob Young (1776-1859), born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which at that time was the western frontier. He emigrated with his parents to Kentucky in 1797, where they purchased untamed land. Jacob was raised Presbyterian, and his parents opposed the hysteria of Methodist meetings, yet Jacob was mesmerized by them and converted to that church. By 1801 he was licensed as a preacher, and soon entered the itinerancy under the care of William McKendree, traveling the Kentucky Salt River Circuit. "He traveled extensively, and few men have been instrumental in the conversion of greater numbers." - Simpson, Cyclopedia of Methodism (1879).