Worcester, Samuel.  Christian Psalmody in Four Parts, with Select Harmony 1815
Worcester, Samuel.  Christian Psalmody in Four Parts, with Select Harmony 1815
Worcester, Samuel.  Christian Psalmody in Four Parts, with Select Harmony 1815
Worcester, Samuel.  Christian Psalmody in Four Parts, with Select Harmony 1815

Worcester, Samuel. Christian Psalmody in Four Parts, with Select Harmony 1815

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Worcester, Samuel. Christian Psalmody in Four Parts: Comprising Dr. Watts's Psalms Abridged; Dr. Watts's Hymns Abridged; Select Hymns from Other Authors; and Select Harmony. Boston: Samuel T. Armstrong, 1815. First Edition. [8527]

Full calf, joints cracked, spine ends chipped, leather over spine abraded with loss, 8 3/4 inches. Lacks the front blanks and the title page leaf. Begins at Preface (iii). Leaf 225-6 bound out of order, between the Preface and the first leaf of text. 226 pp. of text, 47 pp. of music. Text complete other than the title page, which is missing. Fair.

Preface date is Nov. 1814. The imprint for part four - Select Harmony - is dated 1813, and has its own title page & pagination. The Select Harmony is Rudiments of Music, (3)-5, followed by 6)-47 pp. of music, round notes, three parts, with an Index.

Samuel Worcester, D.D. (1770-1821), born at Hollis, New Hampshire, graduated at Dartmouth College with the highest honors in 1795. “[In 1797] he was ordained pastor of the Church at Fitchburg, a society which was cursed by all the evils of the Half-Way Covenant – including among its members Deists, Arians, Universalists, and the openly immoral. With decision, inflexible integrity, and solemn faithfulness to truth and duty, Worcester opened the batteries of the Gospel upon the errors and sins that called for rebuke. As a result, in the ensuing spring, the covenant was revised and an orthodox creed adopted, and in 1799 an extensive revival occurred.” – M’Clintock & Strong.

These efforts by Worcester led to a split in the church at Fitchburg and a failed attempt by the Universalists of the town to substitute their own minister as the tax-supported town parson. Dr. Worcester was a friend to missions, and served as the editor of the Massachusetts Missionary Magazine, as president of the Massachusetts Missionary Society, and was credited with the original idea for the formation of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and was the first corresponding secretary of that organization.

“As a preacher, Dr. Worcester was doctrinal, faithful, and luminous, though his manner was neither easy nor graceful; as a pastor, he was diligent, sympathetic, the poor and the sick sharing his special care. He had considerable musical talent, instructed in sacred music, and gave lectures on church psalmody and music. His influence was felt much in ecclesiastical councils, and he was often called upon to adjudicate disputes and settle difficulties. He was a powerful debater, and some of his speeches were seldom rivaled even in judicial and legislative assemblies.” – M’Clintock & Strong.