Wood & Bache. The Dispensatory of the United States of America
Wood & Bache. The Dispensatory of the United States of America
Wood & Bache. The Dispensatory of the United States of America

Wood & Bache. The Dispensatory of the United States of America

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Wood, George B.; Bache, Franklin. The Dispensatory of the United States of America; Thirteenth Edition, Carefully Revised. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott & Co., 1872. 13th Edition. [7180]

Full sheep with black morocco title labels to spine, binding has light rubbing/scuffs yet is tight, sound, with no cracks. 6 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches, short closed tear to ffep, xii., 1810 clean pp., several text illustrations, tight. Very good. Leather bound.

First published in 1833, this book was a very successful venture that brought a revenue stream to the authors. The 11th edition was distributed to Union Army doctors and some copies are marked U. S. A. Med. Dept. (not this copy). The early editions, such as this one is, gave formulas and instructions for medical men to formulate their own medicines. It is a scholarly work, with references it medical periodicals and books that would further inform the reader. Written during a time when doctors were often their own pharmacologists, the practical and scientific information was and is a treasure-trove of medical treatments. The extensive 56-page triple-column Index allows the reader to quickly find whatever plant or ingredient they wish to research.

George Bacon Wood (1787-1879), a native of Cumberland County, NJ, of Quaker stock. He earned his M. D. in 1818, and conducted a successful medical practice in Philadelphia. His teaching career began in 1822 as Professor of Chemistry at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, retiring in 1860 from the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine.

Franklin Bache (1792-1864), Philadelphia-born physician, great-grandson of Benjamin Franklin. He was a Surgeon's Mate during the War of 1812 for two Infantry Regiments. Among his many achievements was his professorship of Chemistry in the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, his service as Vice-President of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and as President of the American Philosophical Society.