Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman
Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman
Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman
Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman
Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman
Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman

Whitman. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman

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Whitman, Narcissa Prentiss; Elliott, T. C. The Coming of the White Women, 1836: As told in the Letters and Journal of Narcissa Prentiss Whitman; Compiled by T. C. Elliott. Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society, 1937. [7430]

Dark red patterned cloth with gilt titles to front, small paper label base of spine, ex historical society library with the only other matter being pencil call numbers within. 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. 130 pp. a few finger smudges but generally clean, illustrated with plates.

This publication is a compilation of five issues by the Society on the same topic, here bound together with a new title page, Foreword, and index. The first four have their original wrappers bound in. Very good. Hardcover.

"These consist in the main of a series of letters in the form of a Journal written in 1836 by Narcissa Prentiss Whitman, of sainted memory. Mrs. Whitman and her husband Dr. Marcus Whitman, as missionaries to the Cayuse Indians, established a home in the walla Walla valley, state of Washington, in December, 1836. Concurrently her companion Eliza Spaulding and husband Rev. Henry Spalding established a similar home among the Nez Perce Indians near Lewiston, Idaho." - Foreword.

Narcissa Whitman, (neé Prentiss), was one of the two first white woman to cross the Rocky Mountains (the other being Mrs.Spalding, a member of their party) and the first woman to give birth to a white American in the Oregon country. She was a missionary in her own right, accepted for service nearly a year before her marriage to Whitman. She kept the records of their travels and corresponded with family and supporters back east, taught Bible classes to the natives, and ran the day to day affairs of the mission home. A measles outbreak for which native children had no immunity stirred suspicion as the Indians watched their children die while the white children, with some natural immunity, lived. As a direct consequence, Mrs. Whitman and her husband, with eleven other persons, were killed by the Indians on November 29, 1847, and event recorded in history as the Whitman Massacre.