Waller, Absalom. A Drop of Mercy, from the Bright Cloud of Righteousness [Baptist Revivals]

Waller, Absalom. A Drop of Mercy, from the Bright Cloud of Righteousness [Baptist Revivals]

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Waller, Absalom. A Drop of Mercy, from the Bright Cloud of Righteousness : containing, I. A view of the state of Religion in the Congregations at Waller's, County Line, and Bethany, prior to the late revival. II. A Narrative of the commencement and progress of the revivals in those Churches for five months. III. Four Letters on the subject of Experimental and Practical Religion. IV. Some remarks on the regular support of Gospel Ministers. Richmond: William W. Gray, Printer, 1818. 1st Edition. 

Stab-sewn pamphlet, no wrapper, 6 x 9 1/4, untrimmed, 48 pp. Ink name stamp, red number stamp, and penciled call numbers from a church historical society on the tp.  Good. Pamphlet.  [289] $200.00

Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography no. 5571.

Rev. Absalom Waller (1772-1823), nephew of the Baptist minister John Waller of Spottsylvania, converted during a revival in that place in 1787. Sprague has an account of the revival in his entry on John Waller, with a footnote of information regarding Absalom.

"In 1787, there commenced a great revival under Mr Waller's labours, which continued for several years, and extended to all the places in which he exercised his ministry. Of this revival his nephew, Mr. Absalom Waller, became a subject, and, after a few years, began to preach, and by his uncle's request, became his successor in the Pastorate...Absalom Waller was born in Spottsylvania, Va., in 1772; was hopefully converted when he was nineteen years of age, and was ordained to the ministry about two years after. He took charge of Waller's, County Line, and Bethany Churches, and continued to labour for them many years. His ministry was attended by several powerful revivals, the most extensive of which was 1817-1818; but, previous to that time, he had baptized more than fifteen hundred persons. For many years previous to his death, he was afflicted with partial deafness, so as to render it difficult for him to engage in conversation. He died in great peace about the year 1820, and was lamented in death, as he had been esteemed and venerated in life." - Sprague, Annals of the American Baptist Pulpit, (1860).