The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)
The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)

The Tatler & Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison (1855)

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Steele, Richard; Addison, Joseph; Macaulay, Thomas Babbington. The Tatler and Guardian, chiefly by Sir Richard Steele, and Joseph Addison; And an Account of the Authors, by Thomas Babbington Macaulay. Complete in One Volume, with Notes and General Index. New York: Bangs, Brother, & Co., 1855. [7859]

Quarter black leather with bright gilt titles, blue cloth boards, 6 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches, binding very good. xii., 444 + 244 clean pp., foxing to the several steel-engraved plates. Tightly bound, printed in double columns, a handsome volume. Very good. Hardcover.

Sir Richard Steele (1672-1729), b. Dublin, Ireland; d. Carmarthen, Wales. "Essayist, dramatist, journalist and politician, best known as the principal author (with Joseph Addison) of the periodicals The Tatler and The Spectator...on April 12, 1709, he secured his place in literary history by launching the thrice-weekly essay periodical The Tatler...Steele created the mixture of entertainment an instruction in manners and morals that was to be perfected in The Spectator...Addison contributed some 46 papers and collaborated on several others, but the great bulk of the 271 issues were by Steel himself..." - Encyclopedia Britannica online.

Joseph Addison (1672-1719), “one of the most eminent of English authors.” “During his lingering decay he sent for a young nobleman of very irregular life and of loose opinions to attend him; and when the latter, with great tenderness, requested to receive his last injunctions, Mr Addison told him, ‘I have sent for you that you may see how a Christian can die.’” – M’Clintock & Strong.

Rt. Hon. Thomas Babington Macaulay, M.P., Baron of Rothley, in the county of Leicester (b. 1800) was a son of the eminent philanthropist Zachary Macaulay, who died in 1838, and a grandson of the Rev. John Macaulay, a Presbyterian minister in the Scottish Highlands, descended from the Macaulays of the island of Lewis, the most northern and largest of the Outer Hebrides. Macaulay was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge. A member of the bar, he was appointed by the Whig Government a commissioner of Bankruptcy; in 1830 he became a member of Parliament in the Whig interest. Macaulay subsequently held many offices in government, both in India and in England, and was elevated to the peerage in 1857. Macaulay was distinguished, beside his political career, as a poet, essayist, orator, and historian. He died in 1859. From Schaff-Herzog.  (7859)