Wallace, Adam. The Parson of the Islands; A Biography of Rev. Joshua Thomas
Wallace, Adam. The Parson of the Islands; A Biography of Rev. Joshua Thomas

Wallace, Adam. The Parson of the Islands; A Biography of Rev. Joshua Thomas

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Wallace, Adam. The Parson of the Islands; A Biography of Rev. Joshua Thomas; embracing Sketches of his Contemporaries, and Remarkable Camp Meeting Scenes, Revival Incidents, and Reminiscences of the Introduction of Methodism on the Islands of the Chesapeake, and the Eastern Shores of Maryland and Virginia. Cambridge, Maryland: Tidewaters Publishers, 1978. Reprint edition.

Facsimile reprint of the 1861 edition. Very good red cloth with bright gilt titles, 5 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches, former owner's signature on fep, 412 clean and unmarked pp. Dust jacket with small stains in several places, vertical tear base of spine panel, now in a clear wrapper. Very good in fair dust-jacket. Hardcover.  [3732] 

Joshua Thomas (1776-1853), b. Potato Neck (now Fairmont), Maryland; he grew up as a fisherman and lived for a time on Smith Island. About 1778 Methodism swept through the Eastern Shore and the Islands and in 1805 Thomas was at a camp meeting in Pungoteague held by Lorenzo Dow; and in the 1806 camp meeting at Annamessex he was converted to Methodism. "This was the first step on his vocation as the greatest local preacher the Eastern Shore ever produced."

"During the War of 1812, the British fleet made Tangier Sound the center of their operations while the Chesapeake Bay area was under attack. Brother Thomas, as Joshua was now known, conferred with the British Admiral on several occasions as Joshua's reputation as a just and holy man preceded him. Brother Thomas influenced the Admiral to spare the trees around the Methodist camp ground and to use a vacant house as a headquarters rather than seizing a neighbor's home. In the late summer of 1814 the British prepared to take Baltimore. Before they left Tangier Sound, Brother Thomas was summoned to exhort the soldiers. At the appointed hour, some twelve thousand men were lined up in columns to hear Joshua Thomas preach. He warned them of the danger and told them God told him they could not take Baltimore and would not succeed in their battle, which history shows they did not prevail. It was during the British fleet's unsuccessful assault that Francis Scott Key wrote of the bombs bursting in air over Fort McHenry, the words that became our nation's national anthem. While Brother Thomas' part in the war was small, within a short period his reputation grew exceedingly." - Rebecca F. Miller- goldsboroughmarine website.

Bro. Thomas held camp meetings, revival meetings, and preached from a boat he named "The Methodist." This is a vivid account of an itinerant preacher to the islands of the Eastern Shore and conveys a way of life now long past.