Tappan, David. A Discourse delivered to the Students of Harvard College, September 6, 1796

Tappan, David. A Discourse delivered to the Students of Harvard College, September 6, 1796

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Tappan, David. A Discourse delivered to the Students of Harvard College, September 6, 1796. Designed for the special benefit of the New Class, which lately joined the Society. Boston: Manning & Loring, 1796. First Edition.

Evans 31267. Removed, 5 x 8 1/2, light smudging to the tp, 20 pp. Good. Paperback.  [3102] 

A sermon on Philippians 4:8. Amongst other warnings, the author chides is audience for "sly, but cruel tricks of dishonesty, by which inconsiderate students have triumphed over simple rustic credulity" in dealing with the local people. He recommends to them "fervent attachment to the Constitution and Administration of our National Government," and to avoid "a certain unprincipled faction; which, by dark intrigue, and slanderous falsehood, has aimed, under the pretence of popular liberty, to erect a self-created, rebellious, and destructive aristocracy on the ruins of genuine republican freedom, equality, and order." He sums up his sermon with "BE REAL CHRISTIANS."

Rev. David Tappan, D.D. (1753-1803), born at Manchester, Mass. Tappan was admitted to Harvard College at the age of fourteen and received the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1771. He was ordained in 1774, and was pastor of the Congregational Church at Newbury, Massachusetts. In 1792 he was inaugurated Professor of Divinity at Harvard College, where he remained until his death.

“He was regarded as possessing all the characteristics of not only an eminently popular, but eminently useful, preacher; and those who knew him then [in college] were not disappointed by the brilliancy of his subsequent career…In 1794 his Alma Mater conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity…While he discharged with most scrupulous fidelity his various duties as Professor, he often preached to neighboring congregations; and such was his popularity that he was called more frequently than almost any other minister of his day, to officiate on special and extraordinary occasions.” – Sprague.