Stevens, Abel. Essays on the Preaching Required by the Times, and the Best Methods of Obtaining it
Stevens, Abel. Essays on the Preaching Required by the Times, and the Best Methods of Obtaining it

Stevens, Abel. Essays on the Preaching Required by the Times, and the Best Methods of Obtaining it

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Stevens, Abel. Essays on the Preaching Required by the Times, and the Best Methods of Obtaining it; with Reminiscences and Illustrations of Methodist Preaching; including Rules for Extemporaneous Preaching, and Characteristic Sketches of Olin, Fisk, Bascom, Cookman, Summerfield, and other noted Extemporaneous Preachers. New-York: Carlton & Phillips, 1856. [7559]

Burgundy publisher's cloth now faded to brown, gilt title to spines, boards decorated in blind, 5 x 7 1/2 inches, two previous owner's signatures on ffep, one on the tp, 266 clean pp., 4 pp. publisher's catalogue, foxing to end papers, tight, some old soil/spotting to binding. Good. Hardcover.

Portions of the book were first published in the National Magazine for 1854 and in the Methodist Quarterly Review for 1852. They are here "thoroughly revised, enlarged, and otherwise modified...It will be seen that the writer has not attempted anything like a thorough treatise on Homiletics; he confines himself to special questions respecting the methods, the responsibilities, and, particularly, the defects of the modern pulpit, the reasons of its comparatively ineffective and (some allege) declining power. On extemporaneous preaching he has, however, attempted to be more comprehensive and practical." - Preface.

Abel Stevens, D.D. (1815-1897), b. Philadelphia; d. San Jose, California. Stevens was a Methodist Episcopal minister, author, and historian. He was educated at Wesleyan University; and entered the New England Conference in 1834; served one year as agent of the Wesleyan University, and the following year was stationed in Boston. In 1848 he became editor of Zion’s Herald, where he remained for twelve years. In 1852 when The National Magazine was commenced, he was appointed editor. In 1860 he became corresponding editor of The Methodist, and retained this position till 1874. In later years he traveled extensively and was for a time pastor of the Union Church in Geneva, Switzerland. His writings were very widely circulated, and include “Church Polity,” “The Great Reform,” “History of Methodism,” “History of the Methodist Episcopal Church,” “Centenary of American Methodism,” etc.