Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War
Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War
Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War
Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War

Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War

Regular price
$22.50
Sale price
$22.50
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Steevens, G. W. From Capetown to Ladysmith: An Unfinished Record of the South African War; Edited by Vernon Blackburn. Edinburgh and London: William Blackwood and Sons, 1900. First Edition.

Brown cloth, 5 1/2 x 7 3/4 inches. Bookplate of the Royal Thames Yacht Club, former owner's name on ffep, recent private bookplate on ffep, viii., folding map, 180 pp. with one additional map, 32 pp. publisher's catalogue, light foxing, tight. Very good. Hardcover.  [4423] 

George Warrington Steevens (1859-1900), British journalist, "the most famous war correspondent of his time." He wrote for the National Observer, The Pall Mall Gazette, and the Daily Mail. He was attached to the British forces during the Madist War in the Sudan, and was with them in South Africa during the Second Boer War in 1899. He died from typhoid in the siege of Ladysmith.

Published posthumously from Steevens' reports on the Second Boer War of 1899.

"His last sentences on the battle of Elandslaagte are a vigorous epitome of that famous fight. Following that victory came the miserable disaster at Nicholson's Nek, and Ladysmith was soon hemmed in by the Boers. They made war like gentlemen of leisure, and kept their meal-time with the scrupulous exactness of trade unionists. They might have put the defenders to great loss and discomfort; but they had the great defect of all amateur soldiers: they loved their ease, and did not mean to be killed. It is not a comfortable sensation to be in a bombarded town ; but as you go about your business, confidence revives. Everybody got sick of the bombardment, and was almost ready to die of dulness. 'You sit here idly to be shot at. You are of it, but not in it—clean out of the world. To your world and to yourself you are every bit as good as dead—except that dead men have no time to fill in.' Casualties mounted up, and sometimes the dribbling bombardment became appalling. Mr. Steevens has much to say of the handful of sailors who 'have been the saving of Ladysmith.' 'The Royal Navy is the salt of the sea and the salt of the earth also.' A graceful sketch of his friend from the pen of Mr. Vernon Blackburn forms a last chapter. England is poorer to-day for Mr. Steeven's death, and his graphic sketch, slight though it is, will long be treasured by every patriot." - The London Quarterly Review, Volume 93.