Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher
Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher
Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher
Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher

Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher

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Sigston, James. Memoir of the Life and Ministry of Mr. William Bramwell, lately an Itinerant Methodist Preacher; with extracts from his interesting and extensive correspondence. New York: J. Emory and B. Waugh, for the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1830. Third American Edition.

Full leather with red leather spine title label, spine ruled in gilt, outer hinges front and back weak, sometime repaired with paste to the cracks. 4 1/4 x 7 inches, former owner's round emboss stamps (2) on the ffep, 249 pp., foxing, tight. Good. Full leather.  [3875] 

Several editions are in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography, but not this one. See his no. 4890.

"James Sigston, the biographer and friend of the devoted William Bramwell, was a member of the United Methodist Free Churches, England. In early life he was connected with the Wesleyan body, but became dissociated from it in connection with the dissension as to the introduction of an organ into Brunswick chapel, Leeds. The Protestant Methodists, with whom he was identified, made common cause with the Wesleyan association, and Mr. Sigston was elected president of the association in 1838. Mr. Sigston kept a school in Leeds, which was somewhat famous in its day, and he lived to an extreme old age." – Simpson, Cyclopaedia of Methodism

William Bramwell (1759-1818), an Englishman with Anglican heritage. Bramwell entered the itinerancy in 1786 and exercised an active circuit ministry until his sudden death. “Bramwell was an evangelist of remarkable powers, particularly noted for his success in inspiring revivals. During his first appointment to Sheffield between 1795 and 1797, the circuit reported a net increase of 1,500 despite the loss of nearly 1,000 members to the New Connexion. Despite his ability and considerable reputation on both sides of the Atlantic, Bramwell never achieved high office in the Wesleyan Church. This was probably due to his sympathy with dissident elements within Wesleyan Methodism and some elements of his personal spirituality such as his claim to possess the power of discernment of spirits.” – Methodist Archives Biographical Index.     

William Bramwell was the most significant revivalist and holiness evangelist in Methodism. From his leadership of the great revival that broke out in Dewsbury in West Yorkshire in 1792 until his untimely death in 1818, Bramwell’s ministry was marked by fervent prayer, powerful preaching, unremitting pastoral care of converts and a clear and uncompromising emphasis on what John Wesley called Scriptural holiness. - A Book Legacy catalogue.