Philadelphus Samuel Whelpley Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel
Philadelphus Samuel Whelpley Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel
Philadelphus Samuel Whelpley Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel

Philadelphus Samuel Whelpley Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel

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Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong, Esq., Late Governor of Massachusetts, showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel; Justified by no good Principal; not Necessary to the Safety of Individuals or Nations; But Inconsistent with their Welfare; Inconsistent with the Christian Character; and Contrary to the Laws of Christ. Providence: Miller & Hutchins, 1818. Third Edition.

Plain brown calf spine, plain blue paper boards, 5 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches, lacks the front free end papers, 126, (1) pages, light foxing, tight. Good. Hardcover.  [5247] 

Samuel Whelpley (1766-1817); born at Stockbridge, Massachusetts… His father was a Baptist deacon, and he “was ordained a Baptist preacher, 1792, and a Presbyterian preacher, 1806.” – Allibone.

Whelpley has an entry on p. 380 of Sprague's Presbyterian volume of his Annals. He was well-known both as a preacher and as a teacher, sometimes devoting his time to teaching school, and had a reputation for reading and knowing very much about history.

"I know in general that Mr. Whelpley was highly respected in our community, as a teacher, a minister of the Gospel, and a Christian gentleman. His school, while he was at Newark, was in high repute, and I believe there were few more competent teachers in his day. I occasionally heard him preach in Dr. Richards' pulpit, and was always gratified and edified by his public services. His sermons showed a mind trained to close and consecutive thought, while the most prominent characteristic of his manner was a deep and all-pervading solemnity." - Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, LL. D.