Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel
Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel
Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel

Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong...showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel

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Philadelphus; [Whelpley, Samuel]. Letters Addressed to Caleb Strong, Esq., Late Governor of Massachusetts, showing, that Retaliation, Capital Punishments, and War, are Prohibited by the Gospel; Justified by no good Principal; not Necessary to the Safety of Individuals or Nations; But Inconsistent with their Welfare; Inconsistent with the Christian Character; and Contrary to the Laws of Christ. Providence: Miller & Hutchins, 1818. Third Edition.

Plain brown calf spine, plain blue paper boards, 5 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches, lacks the front free end papers, 126, (1) pages, light foxing, tight. Good. Hardcover.  [5247] 

Samuel Whelpley (1766-1817); born at Stockbridge, Massachusetts… His father was a Baptist deacon, and he “was ordained a Baptist preacher, 1792, and a Presbyterian preacher, 1806.” – Allibone.

Whelpley has an entry on p. 380 of Sprague's Presbyterian volume of his Annals. He was well-known both as a preacher and as a teacher, sometimes devoting his time to teaching school, and had a reputation for reading and knowing very much about history.

"I know in general that Mr. Whelpley was highly respected in our community, as a teacher, a minister of the Gospel, and a Christian gentleman. His school, while he was at Newark, was in high repute, and I believe there were few more competent teachers in his day. I occasionally heard him preach in Dr. Richards' pulpit, and was always gratified and edified by his public services. His sermons showed a mind trained to close and consecutive thought, while the most prominent characteristic of his manner was a deep and all-pervading solemnity." - Hon. Theodore Frelinghuysen, LL. D.