Paton.  John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)
Paton.  John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)
Paton.  John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)
Paton.  John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)
Paton.  John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)

Paton. John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set)

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Paton, John G.; Paton, James [editor]. John G. Paton, Missionary to the New Hebrides: An Autobiography (2 volume set). New York: Fleming H. Revell, 1889. Second Edition.

Two volumes in olive cloth, 5 1/2 x 7 3/4, bindings show light wear, no damage. Former owner's signatures at the front of each volume, xv., 375, xvi., 382 clean pp., tight, frontispiece in each volume, top page edges gilt. Good. Hardcover.  [4055] 

This is a vivid account, both of the work in the slums of Glasgow and among the cannibals of the New Hebrides.

Both volumes have introductions by A. T. Pierson. The work was edited by John's brother, James.

"I consider it unsurpassed in missionary biography. In the whole course of my extensive reading on these topics, a more stimulating, inspiring, and every way first-class book has not fallen into my hands. Everybody ought to read it." - A. T. Pierson.

John G. Paton (1824-1907), born near Dumfries, Scotland. Studied medicine and theology in Glasgow. Not long after, he became missionary to the poor in the slums of Glasgow. When Paton was about thirty years old, the Reformed Church of Scotland issued a call for missionaries to the New Hebrides Islands, which Paton answered. Despite the previous missionaries having been murdered, Paton and his new bride went to the island of Tanna. He reduced the native tongue to writing. While on Tanna, Paton’s wife and infant son contracted a fever and died. Paton moved to the island of Aniwa, where he built a home, a mission headquarters, two orphanages, a church, and a schoolhouse. Paton’s ministry there was blessed, as his Aniwa New Testament was printed and the entire island professed Christianity. According to one recent (2001) encyclopedia article, the majority of the island population (now Vanuatu) is Christian.