Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)
Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)
Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)
Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)
Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)
Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)

Parkman. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete)

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Parkman, Francis. The Works of Francis Parkman, Frontenac Edition (17 vols complete). Boston & New York: Little, Brown & Co. | J. F. Taylor & Co., 1902-7. Frontenac Edition. [8015]

15 volumes in blue cloth, publisher's printed title labels to spines, 5 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches, top page edges gilt, rest deckled. Good to very good volumes with no library or private markings, some spine labels edge-worn, books are tight and undamaged with bright clean pages. Illustrated with frontispieces & additional tissue-guarded plates. Each volume has 2 duplicate spine title labels tipped in at end, and could be used as replacements for the worn ones in use. Complete list of titles below. Good. Hardcover.

Vol. I. - Pioneers of France in the New World, vol. 1. Introductory essay by John Fiske. ci., 181 pp.,
Vol. II. - Pioneers of France in the New World, vol. 2. xii., 311 pp.
Vol. III. - The Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century, vol. 1. xiv., 280pp.
Vol. IV - The Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century, vol. 2. xii., 309 pp.
Vol. V. - La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West. xiv., 521 pp.
Vol. VI. - The Old Régime in Canada, vol. 1. xix., 267 pp.
Vol. VII. - The Old Régime in Canada, vol. 2. x., 297 pp.
Vol. VIII. - Count Frontenac and New France Under Louis XIV. xviii., 523 pp.
Vol. IX. - A Half-Century of Conflict, vol. 1. xiv., 368 pp.
Vol. X. - A Half-Century of Conflict, vol. 2. x., 416 pp.
Vol. XI. - Montcalm and Wolfe, vol. 1. xvi., 329 pp.
Vol. XII. - Montcalm and Wolfe, vol. 2. xii., 372 pp.
Vol. XIII. - Montcalm and Wolfe, vol. 3. xii., 394 pp.
Vol. XIV. - The Conspiracy of Pontiac and The Indian War after the Conquest of Canada, vol. 1. xxiv., 381 pp.
Vol. XV. - The Conspiracy of Pontiac and The Indian War after the Conquest of Canada, vol. 2. xii., 484 pp.
Vol. XVI. - The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life (1907) Little, Brown and Company. xx., 479 pp. This volume has weak end paper hinges; nothing is detached.
Unnumbered volume: A Life of Francis Parkman. By Charles Haight Farnham. xx., 393 pp.

All volumes uniformly bound and titled Frontenac Edition.

Francis Parkman (1823-1893), one of the last of the original Boston Brahmins, Harvard-educated, aristocratic in demeanor yet adventurous and industrious in his historical labors. Parkman hiked through many places that were then still wilderness to ascertain the locations and facts of his researches. His travels in New York state and Canada involved bushwacking through areas then almost unreachable that are now public historic sites. The record of the Oregon Trail was an account of his own travels over that western territory. He insisted, when possible, on first-hand observations, and in his studies of the Jesuits even spent time in a monastery in Rome. His incessant studies ruined his eyesight and his health, yet he continued to research and write works much-admired in his lifetime and even today.

"Parkman portrayed the Anglo-French and Indian wars as part of a struggle between contesting civilizations, in which the interior wilderness acted as a modifying force on rival colonial cultures. Perhaps his greatest achievement was his skill in recognizing the dramatic potentials in the raw materials of history, so that he could create a narrative both historically accurate and, as he said, 'consistent with just historic proportion.' When he wrote that his aim was 'to get at the truth,' he explained the search for factual data that underlies his entire work. Not all of his interpretations have been accepted unquestioningly, but Parkman's genius with the pen was such that his main figures - Frontenac, Montcalm, Wolfe, La Salle, and Pontiac - are not so much remembered today because of what they did but because Parkman made them the heroes of his history of Anglo-French rivalry in North America." - Wilber R. Jacobs, Encyclopedia Britannica online.