McBee, Silas. An Eirenic Itinerary: Impressions of our Tour with Addresses and Papers on the Unity of Christian Churches
McBee, Silas. An Eirenic Itinerary: Impressions of our Tour with Addresses and Papers on the Unity of Christian Churches
McBee, Silas. An Eirenic Itinerary: Impressions of our Tour with Addresses and Papers on the Unity of Christian Churches

McBee, Silas. An Eirenic Itinerary: Impressions of our Tour with Addresses and Papers on the Unity of Christian Churches

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McBee, Silas. An Eirenic Itinerary: Impressions of our Tour with Addresses and Papers on the Unity of Christian Churches. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1911. First Edition.

Blue publisher's cloth; 5 1/4 x 7 3/4; frontispiece of Joachim III., Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople; 225 clean pp., tight. The pages remain partially unopened. Good. Hardcover.  [5175] 

Silas McBee (1853-1924), b. North Carolina. McBee was an Episcopal layman, editor of The Churchman, founder of The Constructive Quarterly, and vice president of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew. He was an architect by profession and traveled to Europe in the 1880's to study cathedral architecture, and designed and oversaw the constructions of church buildings in several cities in the South. - see Powell, Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, v. 4.

"The Impressions that follow were originally written for The Churchman, New York, of which the author is the editor. The introduction and concluding chapters are new. The journey was undertaken at the instance of Dr. John R. Mott in connection with the World's Student Federation at Constantinople." - introductory note.

The journey began in January, 1911, in which the party sailed from New York to Europe on the Lusitania. They traveled from Berlin into Russia, then to Italy, Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Rome, Constantinople, returning through France and England. Descriptions of the tour with the conditions of Christian churches keenly in view. This is followed by six different addresses on the subject of Christian unity.