Lathrop, Joseph. The works of God in relation to the church in general, and our own land in particular (1801)
Lathrop, Joseph. The works of God in relation to the church in general, and our own land in particular (1801)
Lathrop, Joseph. The works of God in relation to the church in general, and our own land in particular (1801)

Lathrop, Joseph. The works of God in relation to the church in general, and our own land in particular (1801)

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Lathrop, Joseph. The works of God in relation to the church in general, and our own land in particular, especially in the last century, considered in a Sermon, delivered in West-Springfield, on the 1st day of the Nineteenth Century. Springfield, [MA]: Ashley & Brewer, 1801. First Edition.

Removed, no wrappers, includes the half title page and the "A Hymn sung after Sermon." 5 x 8 1/4 inches, 26 pp. plus (1) - "Hymn." Some faint stains. Good. Pamphlet.

An historical sermon on the progress of Protestant Christianity and the development of the English colonies in America, the Seven Year's War in the colonies, and the American Revolution. Dr. Lathrop's sober reflections on the mercies of God and the blessings of being an American citizen. His hopes for the future we might deem postmillennial: "The day is coming when the kingdom of Christ will overspread the world, and God will purge out of it all things that offend. Ignorant nations must be enlightened and arbitrary governments reformed. The paganism of heathens, the delusion of mahometans, the infidelity of Jews, the superstition of papists, the corruptions of protestants, the stupidity and formality of nominal Christians, must all be removed. Let us diligently promote the faith and practice of religion within the circle of our own influence."

Joseph Lathrop, D.D. (1731-1820), a fifth-generation American at the time of his birth, being a descendant of Rev. John Lothropp, who came to the colonies in 1634 and settled at Barnstable, Mass. DAB neglects our subject, but Sprague has a glowing 13-page article preserving Dr. Lathrops memory in his Annals. Sprague, in fact, was ordained in Lathrops church at West Springfield in 1819, afterwards serving as a colleague pastor in the congregation. "It is fair to assign to Dr. Lathrop as a preacher a place among the most distinguished Divines of New England. In his views of religious truth perhaps he may be said to have held a middle ground between Arminianism and high Calvinism, ranking just about with the school of Doddridge; and there was nothing against which he guarded more in his theological inquiries than the tendency to extremes." Sprague.  (3263)