Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)
Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)

Lardner. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6)

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Lardner, Dionysius. The Museum of Science & Art, Illustrated by Engravings on Wood (12 volumes in 6). London: Lockwood and Co., ca. 1872. [7159]

Six books, each with two volumes of the series, black morocco spines & corners, red & blue marbled boards, spines with raised bands, gilt rules & devices, titles & volume nos. Matching marbled page edges and end papers. All outer hinges fine, light edge-wear, bindings clean, 5 x 7 1/2 inches. Each volume with 208 pp. of text, preliminaries and an extensive index. About 3,000 total pages. Extensively illustrated with very good quality woodcuts. 1916 Christmas gift inscription at the front of each volume.  Very good. Hardcover.

We approximate the date of 1872 - the year the printer Bradbury, Agnew, & Co. was formed by the injection of capital by the art dealer William Agnew into the printing firm Bradbury, Evans, & Co. It is noted that the firm continued to print Punch, but left off soon left off printing books. This printer is named on the verso of the tps.

A treasure trove of practical science as understood in the Victorian Age. The entries may have been based on the author's popular lectures. The principal parts are:

The Planets: Are they Inhabitable?
Weather Prognostics
Popular Fallacies
Lunar Influences
Meteoric Stones and Shooting Stars
Railway Accidents
Light
Common Things - Air
Locomotion by River and Railway in the United States
Cometary Influences
Common Things - Water
The Potter's Art
Common Things - Fire
The Steam Engine
The Eye
The Atmosphere
Common Things - Time
Common Things - Pumps
Common Things - Spectacles
The Kaleidoscope
Common Things - Clocks and Watches
Microscopic Drawing and Engraving
The Locomotive
The Thermometer
The New Planets
Le Verrier and Adams' Planet
Magnitude and Minuteness
Locomotion and Transport, their Influence and Progress
The Moon
Common Things - The Earth
Terrestrial Heat
The Sun
The Electric Telegraph
Earthquakes and Volcanoes
The Barometer
The Safety Lamp
Whitworth's Micrometric Apparatus
Steam
Common Things - The Almanack
Common Things - Colour
Optical Images
Common Things - The Looking-Glass
The Tides
How to Observe the Heavens
The Stellar Universe
Common Things - Man
Magnifying Glasses
Instinct and Intelligence
The Solar Microscope
The Camera Lucida
The Magic Lantern
The Camera Obscura
The Microscope
The White Ants; Their Manners and Times
The Surface of the Earth
Science and Poetry
The Bee
Steam Navigation
Thunder and Lightning, and the Aurora Borealis
Electro-Motive Power
The Printing-Press
The Crust of the Earth
The Stereoscope
Comets
The Pre-Adamite Earth
Eclipses

Rev. Dionysius Lardner, LL.D., b. 1793, Dublin, “one of the most distinguished natural philosophers and mathematicians of modern times.” Dr. Lardner was the professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy in the London University, and resided in America from 1840-5, in which years he delivered Popular Lectures on Science and Art in all of the major cities then in existence in the States. “Few writers have done so much to introduce science as a welcome guest to the family circle, and few, therefore, can so justly claim the honourable title of benefactor to the public mind of the age.” - Allibone.

“The Museum of Science and Art is the most valuable contribution that has ever been made to the scientific instruction of every class of society.” - Sir David Brewster, quoted in Allibone.