Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting
Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting
Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting
Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting
Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting
Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting

Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting

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Kirk, Mrs. Helen. Woman and Prayer; or, the History of the Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting, held in Bristo Place Hall, Edinburgh. London &c.: Thos. Ward &c., 1861. First Edition.

Blue cloth, in blind & gilt, worn, with dampstains. 4 x 6 inches, viii., (9)-268 (1) pp., publisher's catalogue. Old dampstains on the front end papers and first few leaves. Not noticeable after the first 10 pp. Binder's ticket on rear paste-down, "Gowans Binder Glasgow." Fair. Hardcover.  [3838] 

Not in Roberts. Scarce, with Worldcat locating three copies, none of which are in the USA.

The Ladies' Union Prayer Meeting was begun by the second wife of Charles Grandison Finney during her husband's second tour of England, in 1859.

Elizabeth Ford Atkinson Finney (1799-1863) married C. G. Finney in 1848, and was such a strong influence on him that she was resented at Oberlin, with the second trip to England being a prime example. The Oberlin community expressed their strong disapproval of the trip, and Rev. Finney was disinclined to go. Elizabeth, however, persuaded him to change his mind. "In the incident Charles seemed to show indecisiveness and and dependence upon Elizabeth's judgement [sic]...The second trip to England was the crowning event of the Finney's ministry. The success of the trip endorsed Elizabeth's ministry among women, and helped her regain respect in the Oberlin community." - Christian History Issue no. 20, 1988.

This book is an example of how Elizabeth recruited women to help in the revival campaigns. It gives an account of how the meeting began and was conducted, with accounts of Mrs. Finney's teaching and prayers. There are many letters from women involved or affected by the revival, with vivid descriptions of conversions, answers to prayer, the addresses of the female speakers at the meetings, &c.

Mrs. Helen Kirk, wife of Rev. John Kirk, D.D. (1813-1886), an English Wesleyan, professor of Pastoral Theology in the Theological Evangelical Unon. Mrs. Kirk wrote a biography of her husband and the title we have for sale here.