Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692
Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692
Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692
Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692

Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692

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Kidder, Richard. A Sermon Preached before the King & Queen, at White-Hall, The Fifth of November, 1692; By Richard, Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells. Published by their Majesties Special Command. London: Printed for Tho. Parkhurst, at the Bible and Three Crowns, in Cheap-side, 1693. First Edition. [5975]

Removed, includes the half title page, 6 x 7 1/2 inches, (iv.), 31. (1) pp. Good.

ESTC R217179; Wing K415. ESTC locates only 2 copies in North America.

A sermon on the text 2 Samuel 24:14, preached on the occasion of Guy Fawkes Day in remembrance of the failure of the Gunpowder Plot, November 5, 1605. "It was a Treachery and Perfidiousness in the highest degree, a formed Design to blow up the King, the Parliament, our Laws and Religion, our Rights and Liberties at a Blow. 'Twas a Treachery so black and so detestable that Heathens would have abhorred, and punished also. They would have scorned to have overcome their Enemies this way. So far were they from it, that they would have contemned and stigmatized the Traytor that offered them his assistance." pp. 16-17.

Richard Kidder (1633-1703), Bishop of Bath and Wells. His mother is described as a deeply pious woman of Puritan sympathies. He was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and elected a fellow to the same in 1665. In 1658 he was ordained deacon and priest, in the same day, in a private house, by Dr. Brownrigg, the deprived Bishop of Exeter. He was appointed to a vicarage in 1659, but was ejected by the Bartholomew Act in 1662, his reason for nonconformity being that he could not agree to conform to a book he had never seen, the revised Book of Common Prayer. He soon conformed to an extent that would allow him to continue his ministry, but continued to decline preferments and appointments. "In 1689, soon after the accession of William and Mary, he was made one of the royal chaplains, without his knowledge, and was also appointed on the royal commission to consider such alterations in the liturgy, &c., as might give satisfaction to the dissenters in connection with the Comprehension Bill." He reluctantly accepted the appointment to the bishoprick of Bath and Wells, and afterwards regretted the decision, saying "though he could not say that he had acted against his conscience, he did not consult his ease." "Few men were more obnoxious to high churchmen than Kidder, but it is hardly fair to charge him, as he has been charged, with being a mere time-server. He refused many offers of preferment, including at least one bishopric, that of Peterborough; and his literary work, if nothing else, certainly pointed him out for advancement...Kidder was a most industrious and, in many respects, valuable writer." - DNB.