Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing
Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing

Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing

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Johnston, N. R. Looking Back from the Sunset Land or People Worth Knowing. Oakland, California: Self-published, 1898. First Edition.

Maroon cloth, 5 3/4 x 8 inches, light edgewear to binding, spine dull, gold thistle end papers, portrait frontispiece of Johnston, 624 clean pp., several illustrations from photographs, tight. Good. Hardcover.  [5056] 

This book has personal reminiscences of slavery and abolition, Wendell Philips, smuggling slaves through the Underground Railroad, insights regarding RPCNA ministers and congregations, "bloody scenes" of the New York riots of 1863, and his account of missionary work among the Chinese of California. Includes a photograph of the Underground Railroad conductor William Still, and Johnston's reminiscences of Still and his family.

Nathan Robinson Johnston (1820-1904), b. Hopedale, OH; d. Topsham, VT. Reformed Presbyterian minister, editor of the abolitionist paper the Free Press of New Concord, OH; pastor of the congregation at Topsham, VT, from 1852 to 1863, when he was appointed missionary to the "contrabands" of Port Royal, SC. After the war he again served as pastor of churches. and as a Professor in Geneva College. In 1875 he went to California and began missionary work amongst the Chinese. He retired to Topsham, VT, where he wrote his memoir.

"He was a man of marked individuality and with a personality and strength of character that left its mark on every life with whom he came into close contact." - Thompson, Sketches of the Ministers of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America (1930).