Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set
Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set

Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set

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Johnston, James F. The Chemistry of Common Life, 2 volume set; Illustrated with numerous wood engravings. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1857. 

Two volumes in blindstamped teal cloth, 5 x 7 1/2 inches, yellow waxed end papers, church library matter contemporary with the book, 290 + 381 pp., light foxing, publisher's catalogues at the back of both volumes. Very good. Hardcover.  [3910] 

This work treats of the air we breathe and the water we drink; the soil we cultivate and the plant we rear; the bread we eat and the beef we cook; the beverages we infuse; the sweets we extract; the liquors we ferment; the narcotics we indulge in [tobacco, hop, poppy, lettuce, Indian hemp, betel-nut and pepperworts, coca, thorn-apples, Siberian fungus]; the odors we enjoy, and the smells we don't like; what we breathe for and why we digest; the body we cherish; and the circulation of matter.

There are a total of 133 illustrations in the texts.

James Finlay Weir Johnston (1796-1855), b. Paisley, Scotland, in 1827, Scotland; d. Durham, England. Johnston graduated MA in Theology from the University of Glasgow, after which he founded a successful grammar school. In 1830 his fortunate marriage enabled him to devote himself to the study of chemistry. He became the co-founder of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of London. He was appointed reader in Chemistry and Mineralogy at Durham University at its founding in 1833. He was elected chemist to the Agricultural Society of Scotland.

"Johnston successfully sought to give recent scientific discovery a practical application to agriculture and manufactures. Most of his numerous writings attained great popularity...His best and last work [was] 'The Chemistry of Common Life.'" - DNB