Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims
Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims
Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims
Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims
Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims

Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims

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Hopkins, Sarah Winnemucca. Life Among the Piutes: Their Wrongs and Claims; Edited by Mrs. Horace Mann, and Printed for the Author. Boston: Cupples, Upham & Co., 1883. First Edition.

Green cloth with black decorative borders, gilt title to spine, 5 x 7 1/2 inches, private name stamp on top page edge. Thin chip top of spine, blotch bottom of spine from removed label, faint outline of removed bookplate, no institutional markings. Ffep detached and laid in; front paper hinge partially open. 268 clean and unmarked pp., text block tight. Good. Hardcover.  [4315] 

Graff 1950; Rader 1927; Smith 4618. "It is the first outbreak of the American Indian in human literature and has a single aim - to tell the truth." Mrs., Mann, the Editor.

This has been called one of the most important nineteenth century Nevada books.

Sarah Winnemuca Hopkins (1844-1891), b. in Mexico (now Nevada); d. Monida, Montana. A Piute "princess," the daughter and granddaughter of Piute chiefs. "Her writings, valuable for their description of Northern Piute life and for their insights into the impact of white settlement, are among the few contemporary Native American works." - Encyclopedia Britannica.

"When she was thirteen, her grandfather had arranged for Sarah and her sister to become members of Major Ormsby's family at Mormon Station, now Genoa, Nevada. By the time she was fourteen, she had acquired five languages, three Indian dialects, English and Spanish." - Nevada Women's History Project.

Sarah Winnemucca served as an interpreter during conflicts between her people and whites in the 1860's and 1870's, and as an interpreter and scout for the US Army during the Bannock War of 1878. She lectured on behalf of her tribe in San Francisco in 1879 and after her marriage to the US Army Lt. L. H. Hopkins in 1881 she toured the eastern United States promoting her book, Life Among the Piutes. She attracted much attention, including that of President Hayes and the US Congress, who in 1884 passed a bill promising allotment of reservation lands to individual Paiutes, but it was never enforced. She taught at a Paiute school near Lovelock, Nevada, until 1886.