Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion
Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion
Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion
Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion

Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion

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Henwood, Oliver. Hints on the best Means for the Revival of Religion bound with A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns, a Local Preacher in the Methodist Connexion: whose lamented Death was occasioned by an accident in his Paper-Mill, near Buckfastleigh, Devon, Nov. 4, 1828. Bridport | Exeter: The Author | T. Howe, 1832 | 1829. First Edition. Two items with separate imprints, here bound together. "Hints" is Bridport, 1832 and "A Narrative" is Exeter, 1829. Full calve with some scuffs and scratches, outer hinges fine, "Henwood" in red leather spine title label, 4 x 6 inches. Large 1832 inscription in block letters on front paste-down, lacks the ffeps. Old ink scribbles on the title page to the first book and on several additional pp. 106 & 81 pp., tightly bound. Good. Full calf.  [4228] 

Not in Roberts. Hints on the best means for the Revival of Religion is not recorded at Worldcat. A contemporary review has "the author has confined to the topic under consideration. His observations are judicious and well selected, equally remote from extravagance and indifference. This important subject he recommends on scripture grounds, and applies his remarks with becoming energy, both to ministers and people. Practical utility seems to be the great object at which he aims; and, to promote this, his pamphlet is wholesomely suited." - The Imperial Magazine, London (1832).

Henwood calls upon his readers to first pursue personal revival, then improve family religion and church attendance; to acquire a deep and permanent impression of the worth of souls ant the necessity of employing every scriptural method to save them from eternal death; that preachers choose subjects in preach in a style most likely to awaken and edify; that prayer for preachers frequent prayer meetings be employed; and that every member be employed in the work of promoting a revival. He writes against unprincipled zealots, infidel reformers, that ministers should stand aloof from politics, and denounces Socinianism and Calvinism. He advocates for Sunday prayer meetings, forenoon worship, singing, ardent zeal, punctuality, modesty, liberality of sentiment, and strict adherence to the Golden Rule. Tobacco use, gluttony, and intemperance of any kind are counterproductive to revival. The old Wesleyan Love-Feasts and Watchnights are recalled and recommended, as well as the habit of reading of revivals in other places. Finally, he calls his readers to put their entire expectation and dependence for revival success on the outpouring of the Holy Spirit.

The second piece, A Narrative of Mr. Charles Barns is also uncommon, with Worldcat locating one copy. "The Wesleyan Methodists have, in their departed brother, a recent and very satisfactory evidence that Methodism is of God. - By its means the Holy Spirit led him to the knowledge of his state as a sinner, and of Christ as the Saviour: among its members he enjoyed the communion of saints; and in its pulpits he proclaimed the everlasting gospel. His religion was of the right kind; it enabled him to live well, and to triumph over death, when it assailed him in an unusually terrific form." - p. 73. Mr. Barns was crushed in the gears of his mill, living for nearly three days in this condition, speaking peaceably of the gospel to those who waited on him.

Oliver Henwood (1786-1860), entered the English Wesleyan ministry in 1812, a native of the county of Cornwall.