Hallock, Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals
Hallock, Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals
Hallock, Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals
Hallock, Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals

Hallock, Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals

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Hallock, William A. Memoir of Harlan Page; or the Power of Prayer and Personal Effort for the Souls of Individuals. New-York: American Tract Society, 1835. [5992]

Calf spine with black cloth boards in blind, small bit of worming around spine, 4 x 6 inches, fine engraved portrait frontispiece with facsimile signature and guard, extra engraved title page with vignette of a home in the woods, 230 pp., very light tidemark last few leaves, tight. Includes the music to Olivet and Rock of Ages. Very good. Hardcover.

Harlan Page (1791-1834), born at Coventry, Connecticut. “A devoted American Christian layman, noted for his philanthropic labors…He was the only son of pious parents; received a good education, and was taught by his father the trade of a house-joiner. Hew as converted in 1813, and united with the church in 1834…later he engaged in the business of engraving at Andover. In 1825 he was appointed agent of the General Depository of the American Tract Society in New York, which formed in that year…Harlan Page embraced every opportunity of doing good to his fellow-men, and made use of many instrumentalities. The means which he employed were writing letters, distributing tracts, teaching or in superintending Sabbath-schools, holding prayer-meetings, and personal conversation with those around him. The numerous letters which he wrote to unconverted persons are models of personal exhortation and appeal. Plain, but courteous; pointed, but kind and gentle, they seldom failed to produce lasting impressions and convictions. It is said that he was instrumental in the conversion of more than one hundred persons.” – M’Clintock & Strong.

His Memoir, by William Hallock, is number 2553 in Roberts’ Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography, where Roberts remarks, “Page was involved in the revival of 1831.”