Green, Ashbel. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M.
Green, Ashbel. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M.
Green, Ashbel. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M.
Green, Ashbel. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M.

Green, Ashbel. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M.

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Green, Ashbel; Jones, Joseph H. The Life of Ashbel Green, V.D.M., begun to be written by himself in his eight-second year and continued to his eighty-fourth; Prepared for the press at the author's request, by Joseph H. Jones, Pastor of the Sixth Presbyterian Church, Philadelphia. New York: Robert Carter and Brothers, 1849. First Edition.

Black publisher's cloth stamped in blind, gilt titles to spine, 6 x 9 inches, spine end and corner worn, scattered nicks and chips to the cloth, a few white ink drips on the binding. Several former owner's signatures on the end papers, steel-engraved portrait by A. H. Ritchie with tissue guard, 628 pp. with foxing throughout, list of publications by Green. Good. Hardcover.  [3921] 

No. 2444 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. "A good source of revival information including the movement of 1800."

Ashbel Green, D.D. (1762-1848), b. Hanover, NJ; d. Philadelphia, PA. His father was Rev. John Green, for many years pastor of the Presbyterian church in Hanover, and his mother the daughter of Rev. John Pierson of the Presbyterian church in Woodbridge, NJ, and granddaughter of Rev. Abraham Pierson, the first president of Yale College.

Ashbel was a soldier in the New Jersey militia during the Revolution, achieving the rank of Orderly Sergeant, and at the attack on Elizabethtown Point, "was exposed to imminent danger," - his memories of his military service are recorded in his autobiography. "As young Green was remarkably intelligent for a person of his years, he became familiar, during the Revolution, of many of the officers of the American army," and at his graduation from Princeton as valedictorian in 1783, General Washington was present, and met with Green the next day to give his personal compliments.

Green was appointed tutor in the college, and two years later was appointed to the chair of Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, a post he held for a year and a half, and was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of New Brunswick, in 1786. He was ordained over the Second Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia in 1787. His career in his denomination was an illustrious one, serving as Chaplain of the United States Congress from 1792 to 1800, when the Congress was moved to Washington, DC; as a founding member and second president of the American Bible Society; and, from 1812, as president of the theological seminary at Princeton. Green was instrumental in the great revival at Princeton which occurred in 1815.

"Dr. Green was identified with the history of the Presbyterian Church, far more than any man who survived the period of his death. He was a Presbyterian of the strongest conviction; and whatsoever he found to do in promoting the interests of Presbyterianism, he did with his might. He was Moderator of the General Assembly in 1824. In the great controversy which issued in the division of the Church in 1837, he was firmly, sternly with the Old School; and is understood to have heartily concurred in the ultimate measures which were adopted. He watched the contest with the closest scrutiny and deepest concern, until he considered all he principles for which he had contended as settled; and then seemed gracefully to set aside his armour, like a warrior retiring from the battle field. He was always a friend of missions...and he was greatly in favour of a distinct Presbyterian organization, and exerted a considerable influence in effecting it." - Sprague, Annals of the American Pulpit, vol. 3, p. 479-487.