Greeley, Horace. Hints Toward Reforms, in Lectures, Addresses and other Writings
Greeley, Horace. Hints Toward Reforms, in Lectures, Addresses and other Writings
Greeley, Horace. Hints Toward Reforms, in Lectures, Addresses and other Writings

Greeley, Horace. Hints Toward Reforms, in Lectures, Addresses and other Writings

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Greeley, Horace. Hints Toward Reforms, in Lectures, Addresses, and other Writings; Second Edition, Enlarged, with The Crystal Palace and Its Lessons. New York: Fowlers and Wells, 1853. Second Edition. [9262]

Publisher's blue cloth, faded yet intact with perfect joints & corners, 7 3/4 x 5 1/2 inches, 425 clean pp. plus publisher's catalogue, tight. Very good. Hardcover.

A collection of essays focused upon the reform causes that interested the author, including those of labor, character-building, teachers and teaching, temperance, the death penalty, land and homestead reform, flogging in the navy, slavery, tobacco, &c.

Horace Greeley (1811-1872) a journalist who worked for the New Yorker and in 1841 established the New York Tribune, which he would edit for the next 30 years. Greeley used his newspaper influence to campaign against alcohol, tobacco, gambling, prostitution, and, most of all, for the abolition of slavery.

Greeley wrote an open letter to Lincoln in the New York Tribune, Aug. 19, 1862, in which he took issue with the President because Lincoln had not made slavery the dominant issue of the War. Lincoln’s famous reply was, “My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not to save or destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it."