Grant, Asahel. The Nestorians; or, The Lost Tribes
Grant, Asahel. The Nestorians; or, The Lost Tribes
Grant, Asahel. The Nestorians; or, The Lost Tribes

Grant, Asahel. The Nestorians; or, The Lost Tribes

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Grant, Asahel. The Nestorians; or, The Lost Tribes; Containing Evidence of their Identity, an Account of their Manners, Customs, and Ceremonies, together with Sketches of Travel in Ancient Assyria, Media, and Mesopotamia, and illustrations of Scripture Prophecy. New-York: Harper & Brothers, 1841. First Edition. [6261]

Maroon blindstamped cloth faded to brown, 4 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches, binding worn at the edges and chipped at the spine ends. Two old bookseller paper tickets on the front paste down, long pencil comment on the ffep, 11 1/x x 9 1/2 folding map "Country of the Nestorian Christians" complete but with 3 1/2 inch tear at one of the folds. 385 pp. plus publisher's catalogue, light foxing. Good. Hardcover.

Asahel Grant, M.D. (1809-1844), b. Marshall, NY; d. Mosul, Asiatic Turkey. He was a medical doctor with a large practice in Utica, NY, and an elder in the Presbyterian Church in that city. He took an interest in missionary work and sailed for Persia in 1835 under the auspices of the ABCFM. "Dr. Grant's character as a physician secured him the favor of the Persian governor, and the Nestorian bishops and priests gave him a hearty welcome. For five years he worked with great assiduity among this remnant of the once great Nestorian Church. Schools were established both for boys and girls, and great good was wrought among those who came under his influence. His wife's death and his own failing health led him to return to the United States, but receiving the appointment of missionary to those Nestorians who lived in the rugged hills of Koordistan, known as the 'Waldenses of the East--the Protestants of Asia,' he again went to Persia a year later, and opened a school. Ascertaining that an alliance had been made tending toward the destruction of the independence of this people, he endeavored to persuade them to make terms with the Turks ; but this they were unwilling to do, and in consequence a massacre occurred in 1843, in which 10,000 were killed. The missionaries were compelled to fly for their lives, and Dr. Grant, settling for a while in Mosul, devoted all his energies to the work of relieving the wretched fugitives who crowded the City. " - Appleton's Encyclopedia.

"Grant had believed that the Nestorians were a remnant of the ten lost tribes of Israel and that their redemption would signal the end of Islam." - Dana L. Robert, in the Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, edited by Gerald H. Anderson.