Gillon R. Moffat. John Davidson of Prestonpans: Reformer, Preacher and Poet in the Generation after Knox
Gillon R. Moffat. John Davidson of Prestonpans: Reformer, Preacher and Poet in the Generation after Knox
Gillon R. Moffat. John Davidson of Prestonpans: Reformer, Preacher and Poet in the Generation after Knox

Gillon R. Moffat. John Davidson of Prestonpans: Reformer, Preacher and Poet in the Generation after Knox

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Gillon R. Moffat. John Davidson of Prestonpans: Reformer, Preacher and Poet in the Generation after Knox. London: James Clarke & Co, 1936.

Red cloth, 8 1/2 x 6, 275 pp., clean, tight. No dust jacket; former owner's signature on ffep. Very good. Hardcover.  [5392] 

No. 2361 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. "God mightily used Davidson in the General Assembly revival in the Church of Scotland in 1596. Chapter seven gives a stirring account of his call for the Solemn Assembly, the preparation of the catalogue of sins to be confessed, and the gracious outpouring of the Spirit of God that followed."

John Davidson (c.1549-1604), Reformed Scottish minister, studied at St. Andrews during the last years of John Knox, outlawed and exiled from 1574 to 1577, and sought refuge on the Continent. At his return he was minister at in several parishes before settling at Prestonpans, where he remained from 1595 until his death. He at times had to keep an armed guard for protection from the government, and was forced to flee to England in 1584 "to escape danger to his liberty and life caused by his opposition to laws confirming episcopacy and royal supremacy in spiritual matters and be his defence of Protestant nobles who had in the Raid of Ruthven (1582) kidnapped the young King James VI to deliver him from Romanist influence. His objection to the imposition of prelacy, to unbiblical ritual in worship and to civil restraints upon Church discipline later provoked James VI (whom he had often personally rebuked for his swearing, Sabbath breaking and Church politics) to imprison him in Edinburgh Castle in 1601 and confine him to Prestonpans until his death." - Christian Study Library online.