Fleury, Claude; Clarke, Adam. Manners of the Ancient Israelites
Fleury, Claude; Clarke, Adam. Manners of the Ancient Israelites
Fleury, Claude; Clarke, Adam. Manners of the Ancient Israelites

Fleury, Claude; Clarke, Adam. Manners of the Ancient Israelites

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Fleury, Claude; Clarke, Adam. Manners of the Ancient Israelites: containing an account of their Peculiar Customs and Ceremonies; their Laws, Polity, Religion, Sects, Arts and Trades, Divisions of Time, Wars, Captivities, &c. with a short account of the Ancient and Modern Samaritans. Written originally in French by Claude Fleury, Abbe of Argenteuil, and Member of the Royal Academy, Paris. The whole much enlarged from the principal Writers on Jewish Antiquities, by Adam Clarke, LL.D., F. S. A. From the Second London Edition. New-York: J. Emory and B. Waugh, for the Methodist Episcopal Church, 1832. [6924]

Full tree calf, front outer hinge cracked with inside paper hinge strong, some chipping with loss to backstrip, 4 1/4 x 7 inches, 283 pp., generally light foxing with some darker pages, text block tight. With an Index. Fair. Full calf.

The first French edition was published in 1691. The work begins with an account of the Old Testament Patriarchs and concludes with a description of the liturgy of the "modern Jews."

Claude Fleury (1640-1723), “an eminent French historian and divine…His reputation rests chiefly upon his Church History, in twenty volumes, the first of which was published in 1691, and the last in 1722, ending with the year 1414…His other writings were very numerous.” – M’Clintock & Strong.

Adam Clarke (1760 or 62-1815), Wesleyan Methodist and Arminian expositor. He was a Methodist class leader, scholar of the ancient Biblical languages, and personal friend of the Wesley’s. Spurgeon says of Clarke "Adam Clarke is the great annotator of our Wesleyan friends; and they have no reason to be ashamed of him, for he takes rank among the chief of expositors. His mind was evidently fascinated by the singularities of learning, and hence his commentary is rather too much of an old curiosity shop, but it is filled with valuable rarities, such as none but a great man could have collected." - Commenting and Commentaries, in the introductory material.