Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice
Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice
Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice
Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice
Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice
Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice

Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice

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Emmons, Nathanael. Sermons, on various important subjects of Christian Doctrine and Practice. Boston: Samuel T. Armstrong, 1812. First Edition.

Full calf, light scuffing, red leather spine title label, spine with gilt rules, 5 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches, recent owner's signature on ffep, 374 pp. plus 2 pp. subscriber's list. Foxing, tight, very good. Very good.   [4382] 

Nathanael Emmons (1745-1840), born at East Haddam, Connecticut, which was also the birthplace of David Brainerd (1718). He graduated with honor at Yale in 1767, studied theology with Rev. Nathan Strong and afterwards with Dr. John Smalley. In 1773 he was ordained pastor of the Congregational church in Franklin, Massachusetts, and remained as pastor of that congregation for the next fifty-four years. Revivals of religion blessed his ministry in the years 1784, 1794, and 1808-9, and two others in later years. It is said that he lived to see over four hundred of his parishioners profess their faith in Christ. His examinations for church membership were strict, and he was very active in teaching young men for the ministry – close to one hundred young men were tutored and guided by him personally to that end. He was a founder and first president of the Massachusetts Missionary Society and one of the original editors of the Massachusetts Missionary Magazine. He was a zealous anti-mason and an active abolitionist, and a Federalist in politics. He was also “Hopkinsian” in his theological views, that is, he considered himself a Calvinist who would speak plainly on all texts of scripture, rather than bending all texts to fit a theological preconception. He was very widely esteemed.

"A peculiar little fellow with a sharp tongue and a wad of tobacco in his cheek, Emmons is hardly typical of the New England preachers. He was educated at Yale at a time when it was in a very low state spiritually, but despite his rather weak preparation for ministry, he was an unusually effective communicator. His sermons were very pungent and large numbers of students delighted to sit under his ministry. The bulk of his life was spent in the pastorate in Franklin, Massachusetts where a major revival occurred in 1784 and at periodic intervals thereafter." - Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography.

Twenty-one sermons. Some of the titles are: The true God is to be worshipped, as existing in three Persons; Human and divine agency inseparably connected; Men have a natural, but not a moral power, to prevent what God has decreed; The Scripture account of the Devil ought to be believed; The exhibition of Christ tries the human heart; Christ will reject mercenary followers; It is the duty of sinners to make them a new heart; Selfishness the essence of depravity; Great men the servants of God. Preached on the occasion of the death of General Washington, Jan. 30, 1800.