Elliot. The Debates of the several State Conventions, on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (5 volume set)
Elliot. The Debates of the several State Conventions, on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (5 volume set)

Elliot. The Debates of the several State Conventions, on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (5 volume set)

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Elliot, Jonathan. The Debates of the several State Conventions, on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (5 volume set); As recommended at the General Convention at Philadelphia, in 1787. Together with the Journal of the Federal Convention, Luther Martin's Letter, Yates's Minutes, Congressional Opinions, Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of '98-99, and other Illustrations of the Constitution. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company, 1941. Reprint of the Second Edition. [8208]

Cover title: Elliot's Debates.

Two large books in maroon cloth. The first contains volumes 1, 2, and 3 of the original set; the second contains volumes 4 and 5. The books measure 6 1/2 x 9 inches, and take up 5 3/4 inches of shelf space. An ex academic library set from the non-circulating reference section. Standard library markups including white spine labels. Bindings are somewhat faded yet sound and tight, and the texts - apart from library stamps - are clean. Very good. Hardcover.

A facsimile reprint of the five volume second edition of 1836, here bound into two large books. This print run was limited to 750 sets. Cover title: Elliot's Debates. This facsimile set was printed from the original plates of the second edition.

Several notices and recommendations received are at the front of the first volumes, including those from James Madison, Joseph Story, and J. C. Calhoun.

"A great body of valuable materials relative to the Federal Constitution is embraced in Mr. Elliot's work...The Debates and Proceedings of the General Convention, and the State Conventions, are given at large, as far as they have been reported. There is also a vast sum of matter touching the practice of the Constitution in the halls of Congress, and in the courts of the Union. Politicians must save labor by consulting it." - National Intelligencer, May 28, 1830.