d'Aubigne, J. H. Merle. The Reformation in England (Two volume set)
d'Aubigne, J. H. Merle. The Reformation in England (Two volume set)

d'Aubigne, J. H. Merle. The Reformation in England (Two volume set)

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d'Aubigne, J. H. Merle. The Reformation in England (Two volume set); Edited by S. M. Houghton, M.A. Carlisle, Pa: Banner of Truth, 1977. ISBN: 9781848716506.

1977 printing by Banner of Truth, has the older dust jacket illustrations. Two volume set in red cloth, no dust jackets, clean and unmarked texts, tight. Ex Bible college library with the usual extras. Good. Hardcover.  [5311] 

Jean Henri Merle D’Aubigne (1794-1872), born in Geneva, Switzerland, to Huguenot (French Protestant) parents. He was thoroughly educated, but without the benefit of a Christian education. The Geneva of his day no longer reflected the teachings of Calvin and the Reformation. A visit by the Scottish Presbyterian Robert Haldane to the city in 1817 resulted in the conversion of many, including D’Aubigne. He commenced theological studies at Berlin under J. A. W. Neander and W. M. L. de Wette, was ordained, and in 1818 became the pastor of the French Reformed Church in Hamburg. It was about this time that his great contribution to church history was begun – The History of the Reformation. He eventually spent 41 years as professor of church history in Geneva. It was in 1835 that the first volume of The History of the Reformation of the Sixteenth Century was published in French. This five-volume work was completed in 1853. It appeared in English in several different sets & bindings; the work was published in parts over the two decades before its completion. D’Aubigne also published an 8 volume History of the Reformation in Europe in the Time of Calvin.

Merle d'Aubigné had two basic presuppositions that guided him in his work: 1 - the historian must trace the hand of God directing history, and 2 - the historian should have an evangelical faith that is sympathetic to the Reformation. He believed that the primary task of the historian was to trace the hand of God guiding and directing history. To him providence was the key to understanding the history of the Reformation “The impulse was given by an invisible and mighty hand: the change accomplished was the work of Omnipotence. An impartial and attentive observer, who looks beyond the surface, must necessarily be led to this conclusion. "