[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans (1828 First Edition)
[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans (1828 First Edition)
[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans (1828 First Edition)
[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans (1828 First Edition)

[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans (1828 First Edition)

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[Cooper, James Fenimore]. Notions of the Americans: picked up by a Travelling Bachelor; In Two Volumes [complete]. London: Henry Colburn, 1828. First Edition. [7890]

Two volumes, sometime rebound with cloth spines, paper title labels, and blue paper boards, 6 x 9 inches, new end papers, xxiv., 459, xii., 477 clean pp., 2 pp. publisher's catalogue. Includes the half-titles. New paper spine labels read, "J. F. Cooper | Notions | of the | Americans | I [or II]." Very good. Hardcover.

BAL3841. The true first edition with the American edition by Carey, Lea & Carey published a few weeks later. The new binding follows that of the original, which BAL describes one of the options as "Blue boards, drab paper shelfback. Printed paper label on spine."

"The Marquis de Lafayette suggested to Cooper that he write an account of the Lafayette tour of the United States in 1824 and 1825. Cooper couldn't refuse, but he ended up writing of a fictional journey across the country taken by a Belgian tourist who was guided by an American named Cadwallader. The first edition of Notions of the Americans was published by Henry Colburn in London in June 1828." - American Antiquarian Association online.

"The 'Travelling Bachelor' who is named as author on the original title page of this two-volume work is in fact James Fenimore Cooper (1789–1851), best remembered today as the writer of The Last of the Mohicans (1826), generally regarded as his masterpiece, which has remained in print and been adapted for cinema and television many times. In fact, Cooper was a prolific author of political journalism and travel writing as well as novels. His Notions of the Americans is an epistolary work in which Cooper adopts the persona of a well-travelled European clubman who has decided to explore the United States in the same spirit as that in which the offspring of the British nobility undertook the Grand Tour. Within a light-hearted narrative, Cooper's serious purpose was to reveal the nature of this brand-new nation to his own countrymen as well as to Europeans." - Cambridge University Press.

"Notions of the Americans in considered Cooper's first work of non-fiction despite a thin overlay of character and plot. Written in the form of a travel narrative, it addresses the widespread ignorance he encountered in Europe about the people and institutions of the United States. It is an exuberant chant of praise for American representative democracy, encapsulating the utopian vision that compelled Cooper's writing career over three decades." - SUNY Press.