Cooke, John Esten. My Lady Pokahontas: A True Relation of Virginia. Writ by Anas Todkill, Puritan and Pilgrim
Cooke, John Esten. My Lady Pokahontas: A True Relation of Virginia. Writ by Anas Todkill, Puritan and Pilgrim
Cooke, John Esten. My Lady Pokahontas: A True Relation of Virginia. Writ by Anas Todkill, Puritan and Pilgrim

Cooke, John Esten. My Lady Pokahontas: A True Relation of Virginia. Writ by Anas Todkill, Puritan and Pilgrim

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Cooke, John Esten. My Lady Pokahontas: A True Relation of Virginia. Writ by Anas Todkill, Puritan and Pilgrim. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1885. First Edition.

Brown cloth, old blotchy stains to binding, 5 x 7 inches, former owner's signature on ffep (Sprinkle), iv., 190 clean pp., tight. Good. Hardcover.  [5037] $22.50

Written by the author long after his experiences as a Confederate officer, this novel plays out the tensions between an ideal vision and the existing realities. It is a parable of sorts of the loss of Old Virginia just as the Indians lost their wilderness with the arrival of the English. [Cooke] "seems to have come out of the War wrestling with the problems of substance and dream...for in My Lady Pokahontas Cooke focuses on the dream as conscious artifact, forcing reader concern for the sea-change taking place in post-war Southern culture and imagination." - Carl A. Bredahl, Responding to the "Airplant" Tradition: John Cooke's My Lady Pokahontas, in The Southern Literary Journal, Fall 1988.

John Esten Cooke (1830-1886), b. Winchester, Virginia; served as an artillery officer and aide-de-camp to Confederate General J. E. B. Stuart during the American Civil War. Cooke's first poem was published in 1848, and he continued writing before, during, and after the war. He wrote historical novels of the colonial and early days of Virginia, of life in the Confederate army, and of the period of Reconstruction.

"Cooke's work holds a significant place in Virginia's literary history and in nineteenth-century American literary culture. He was arguably the most famous Virginia writer of his period, a skilled historical romancer in the tradition of Walter Scott, James Fenimore Cooper, and William Gilmore Simms who repeated turned to Virginia's past as his inspiration for fiction." - Dictionary of Virginia Biography.