Circular respecting The Swiss Mission among the Roman Catholics at Grande Ligne of Acadie, Lower Canada

Circular respecting The Swiss Mission among the Roman Catholics at Grande Ligne of Acadie, Lower Canada

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[Wilder, Sampson Vryling Stoddard]. Circular respecting The Swiss Mission among the Roman Catholics at Grande Ligne of Acadie, Lower Canada. New-York: Printed by G. P. Scott, 1839. First Edition. [9687]

Stab-sewn pamphlet, 18.2 x 11.5 cm, several ink stamps to front, ex historical society. 11 (1) pp., light soil to wrapper. Good. Pamphlet.

Not in OCLC. Catholic Research Resources Alliance online attributes the pamphlet to S. V. S. Wilder. The link shows one holding, at the Catholic Historical Research Center of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

A history of the mission and an appeal for funds to erect "a Mission-House at Grande Ligne, in which schools can be taught, public worship maintained, and a devoted missionary family accommodated." The appeal is undersigned in print by nine persons, Americans, both clergy and laymen, including S. V. S. Wilder, Gardiner Spring, Richard T. Haines, John Proudfit, &c.

"In October, 1835, Mr. Louis Roussy, under the direction of the 'Commission of the churches of Switzerland associated for Evangelization,' arrived in Montreal, devoted to the religious instruction of the French Canadians. After proper consultation, he judiciously commenced his labours by procuring the office of school-master at Grande Ligne, of Acadie, a settlement lying west of the river Richelieu, the outlet of Lake Champlain, twenty miles to the north of the boundary line of the state of New-York, and ten miles south of the town of St. Johns, among a population of about fifteen hundred, not living very compactly, but scattered upon their small farms...The Catholic priest, naturally dreading the effect of such instruction, caused him to be removed from the office of teacher...From that time to the present he has devoted himself exclusively to the work of religious visitation and public preaching of the gospel." - pp. 3 & 4.

Relates the furious opposition faced, including mobs invading the place of worship, the mutilation of a horse and the beating of Mr. Roussy himself. In October of 1837 a mob sought out the missionaries and about 60 persons who had converted to Protestantism and forced them to flee for their lives, leaving their goods and homes to be destroyed by fire. They eventually returned to rebuild, but met violent opposition again in 1838 during the armed rebellion against the government.

Here, a year later, is an appeal for the support of the missionaries and the evangelical Protestant churches they had begun to build amongst the Catholics.