Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations
Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations
Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations
Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations

Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations

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Chaplin, Jeremiah. Causes of Religious Declension; particularly those which have occasioned the Present Low State of Religion among different Denominations. Hartford: Canfield and Robins, 1837. First Edition.

Good green cloth with embossed floral pattern, spilled ink stain on back cover, 4 1/4 x 6 1/2, some marginal water stains (seen particularly on the title page), several former owner’s signatures on the ffep, 108 pp. Good. Hardcover.  [3896] 

No. C2063 in Starr, A Baptist Bibliography. No. 1019 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography.

15 chapters on causes of spiritual decline in the individual, including neglect of prayer, "improper connections with the ungodly," desecration of the Sabbath, perversion of the doctrine of grace, dependence too much on a pastor, "violent religious excitements," etc.

Jeremiah Chaplin (1776-1841), b. Rowley, Massachusetts; d. Hamilton, New York. Chaplin graduated from Brown in 1799 where he tutored for two years. He studied theology with Dr. Thomas Baldwin of Boston, and became pastor of Danvers (MA) Baptist church in 1802. His views were Calvinistic or Reformed Baptist. He was chosen Professor of Divinity at Waterville College (now Colby College) in 1818, and president of the same in 1822, serving until 1833 when he returned to the pastoral ministry, at Willington, Connecticut.