Channing, William E. Self-Culture: An Address Introductory to the Franklin Lectures, delivered at Boston, September, 1838
Channing, William E. Self-Culture: An Address Introductory to the Franklin Lectures, delivered at Boston, September, 1838

Channing, William E. Self-Culture: An Address Introductory to the Franklin Lectures, delivered at Boston, September, 1838

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Channing, William E. Self-Culture: An Address Introductory to the Franklin Lectures, delivered at Boston, September, 1838. Boston: James Munroe & Co., 1839. [7000]

Faded cloth boards, binding quite worn, 5 x 7 3/4 inches, lacks the front free end papers, 57 (1) pp., foxing throughout, a bit shaken. Fair. Hardcover.

Channing was a leader of the Transcendentalist movement, and this address sets forth the concept that man can transform himself, by his own power and decisions.

"But self-culture is possible, not only because we can enter into and search ourselves. We have a still nobler power, that of acting on, determining and forming ourselves. This is a fearful as well as glorious endowment, for it is the ground of human responsibility. We have the power not only of tracing our powers, but of guiding and impelling them, not only of watching our passions, but of controlling them, not only of seeing our faculties grow, but of applying to them means and influences to aid their growth. We can stay or change the current of thought. We can concentrate the intellect on objects which we wish to comprehend. We can fix our eyes on perfection and make almost every thing speed us towards it. This is indeed a noble prerogative of our nature. Possessing this, it matters little what or where we are now, for we can conquer a better lot, and even be happier for starting from the lowest point. - p. 11.

William Ellery Channing, D.D. (1780-1842), born at Newport, Rhode Island, “an eminent Unitarian divine and philanthropist…To the American community in general Channing is chiefly known as a theologian, while on the other side of the Atlantic his fame is chiefly that of a literary man and a philanthropist.” – M’Clintock & Strong.