Brooks. Mock-Turtle: Being the Memoirs of a Victorian Gentleman (1931)
Brooks. Mock-Turtle: Being the Memoirs of a Victorian Gentleman (1931)
Brooks. Mock-Turtle: Being the Memoirs of a Victorian Gentleman (1931)

Brooks. Mock-Turtle: Being the Memoirs of a Victorian Gentleman (1931)

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Brooks, Collin. Mock-Turtle: Being the Memoirs of a Victorian Gentleman; With an Introduction by Barnaby Brook. New York: Minton Balch & Company, 1931. [7376]

Lavender cloth with gilt titles, spine faded to brown, former library Masonic library copy with standard old-style markups including black ink call numbers on the spine, bookplate & card pocket, "withdrawn" stamps. 5 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches, 316 clean pp. No dust jacket. Good. Hardcover.

"Barnaby Brook" was the pseudonym of William Collin Brooks (1893-1959), British journalist, radio broadcaster, and author. He was awarded the Military Cross for "conspicuous gallantry" as a 2nd Lieutenant in WWI; after the war he was a newspaper journalist for over 30 years and the editor of Truth for 12 years. A prolific writer in many genres, including academic, novels, mysteries, and poetry, he wrote some 50 books during his career.

Brooks represents himself as the editor of these Memoirs, which he prepared for publication. "Internal evidence will provide sufficient clues to the identity of the not undistinguished compiler of this autobiographical survey of almost half a century of Victorian life...The writer of these pages in their original mass is so completely self-revelatory that any editorial introduction must be a redundancy...The writer of these memories was a very active politician, but never with Cabinet rank, and had, as will be seen, a close interest in London political journalism during many exciting political years. His manuscript contains many passages which throw vivid light upon the maneuverings of statesmen and politicians at certain times of crisis...many readers may find such episodes as the Kilmainham treaty, the abandonment of Gordon and the two classes of will between Queen Victoria and her principal ministers illuminated, and may appreciate the light which is thrown upon such personalities as Edward VII, Henry Irving, and Thackeray."

This biographical story of an unnamed "Victorian Gentleman" gives a vivid account of political and social life of that class of men in London during the late 19th century.