Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee
Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee
Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee
Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee
Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee

Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee

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Brooks, John. The Life and Times of the Rev. John Brooks, in which are contained A History of the Great Revival in Tennessee; with many Incident of thrilling interest. Written by Himself. To which are added, Two Sermons by the Author, and a Discourse by the Late Rev. Learner Blackman. Nashville: Nashville Christian Advocate Office, 1848. First Edition.

Full leather, clear tape over spine, 4 1/2 x 7 inches, recent former owner's signature on ffep, 175 pp., light foxing, a few pp. with pencil markings. Good.   [3890] 

Not in Roberts.

John Brooks, b. 1792 to pioneers in Oglethorp Co., GA. John's father was a veteran of the Revolutionary War and with the Indians "on the banks of the Okono or Chatahoochee." John served under General Jackson in the Southern Army during the War of 1812, falling dangerously ill in 1814. He describes Methodist camp-meeting scenes, for instance, Mt. Pisgah Camp-ground, Giles Co., Tennessee, in 1816. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1818, and entered the ministry. His memoir is full of vivid revival and camp-meeting recollections.

"Rev. John Brooks' autobiography is something of a literary medley, giving incidents of his own career, the story of 'The Great Revival in Tennessee,' two sermons by the author, and a discourse by the Rev. Learner Blackman. There is no effort at literary style, and the diction is such as would be expected in a self-educated but enthusiastic Methodist minister of the pioneer days. He was born in Georgia in 1792. It has been said that if Pepys' diary had never been written the history of the court of Charles II. could not have been produced. American history is indebted to such little personal narratives as this autobiography for its color. From first hand here we get illuminative descriptions of the camp-meeting, the religious frenzy denominated 'the jerks,' the beliefs (and surprising superstition and general ignorance) of the masses, the amusements and customs prevailing in the backwoods, the intense intolerance of the sects, the prevalence of infidelity, and the tremendous consecration of the Methodist itinerants of that time." - Hale & Merritt, A History of Tennessee and Tennesseans, vol. II. p. 459 (1913).