Bristol.  History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Bristol.  History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Bristol.  History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, Uxbridge, Massachusetts
Bristol.  History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, Uxbridge, Massachusetts

Bristol. History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, Uxbridge, Massachusetts

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Bristol, Frank Louis. One Hundred and Sixty-One Years: or a History of the First Evangelical Congregational Church, otherwise known as the First Church of Christ in Uxbridge, Mass. (Uxbridge, Mass.): (Compendium Steam Press), (1891). First Edition. [8349]

Black cloth, gilt title to front, decorated in blind, 4 3/4 x 7 1/4 inches, light rubbing to binding, clean, tight. Page edges dyed red; brown floral end papers. Frontispiece portrait of the author with his signature in black ink. 127 clean pp. & 3 additional b/w plates. Very good. Hardcover.

The town of Uxbridge was established from the western portion of the town of Mendon in 1727. In that same year a meeting house was erected "within the fence of Ebenezer Read's pasture," and this congregational church was founded. The original church covenant is reprinted here, with a pledge to set "ourselves strenuously against the general growing and prevailing sins of the times, as pride in heart and life, irreverence in the worship of God, all taking of His holy name in vain, and profanations of the Sabbaths, disobedience to superiors in family, town, church and commonwealth, idleness, lasciviousness, vain company-keeping, drunkenness, uncleanness, unrighteous dealings, false speaking, coveting, with all other violations of God's holy law, by which occasion or where by occasion may be afforded to others to think or speak evil of our holy profession."

This "Evangelical" congregation was the part of the original church that resisted the Unitarian movement of the early nineteenth century and covenanted together to always support a Trinitarian ministry in the pulpit. The division led to the erection of a separate meeting house in 1833, and controversies over ownership of the original church furniture and records.

This history includes brief biographies of the pastors of the church, the by-laws as of 1891, and a list of 1072 members from 1730 to 1891, with name, date and manner of admission, and date and manner of removal, if removed.