Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity
Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity
Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity
Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity
Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity
Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity

Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity

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Benson, Joseph. Sermons on Various Occasions, and most of them on the Principal Subjects of Genuine Christianity. New-York: J. Soule and T. Mason, for the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States of America, 1817. [5842]

Full calf with red calf title label, gilt rules to spine, binding with some old scuffs yet firm and tight, 5 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Engraved stippleplate portrait of Benson by Thomas Gimbrede of New York, closed horizontal tear in the margin near bottom. viii., 434 unmarked pp., dark foxing. Very good.

Joseph Benson (1748-1821), English Methodist. “Intended by his father for the Anglican ministry, Benson received a sound classical education and became a teacher at the age of sixteen. Converted under the influence of a Methodist cousin, he was introduced to John Wesley and was appointed classics master at Kingswood School. In 1769 Benson entered St Edmund Hall, Oxford, but was denied Anglican orders because of his Methodist sympathies. After serving for a short time as headmaster of the Countess of Huntingdon's ministerial training college at Trevecca, he joined the Methodist itinerancy in 1771. Benson was a great favorite of John Wesley and the two often corresponded. He went on to become President of Conference in 1798 and 1810 and served as its secretary in 1805 and 1809. In 1803 Benson was appointed connexional editor and in this capacity was a major influence on the development of the Methodist Magazine.” – Methodist Archives website.