Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805
Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805

Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805

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Bald, F. Clever. Detroit's First American Decade, 1796 to 1805. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1948. First Edition. [7384]]

Green cloth with bright gilt to spine, 6 x 9 inches, former library copy with white ink call numbers to spine, a few ink stamps within. xi., 276 otherwise clean pp., tight, illustrated, large folding map in pocket replicating Fort Lernoult and Detroit in 1796, drawn by Major John Jacob Ulrich Rivardi.

"Very little has been written about Detroit during the first decade of American occupation...Historians have neglected the years 1796 to 1805, perhaps because they seemed to be unimportant. Detroit was a frontier village, far from the seat of the national government and the populous cities of the eastern seaboard....

"The first American decade lends itself well to treatment as a separate subject, for it is a natural unit. It opens with the occupation of Fort Lernoult by American troops and the proclamation of Wayne County, Northwest Territory, in 1796; it closes with the arrival at Detroit of the Governor and the other officers of the newly established Michigan Territory in 1805. The complete destruction of the town by fire, in the same year, also marked the end of a period and made possible a new beginning on a grander scale.

"This book is intended to bridge the historical gap between the British régime and the establishment of Michigan Territory. Its basic theme is the slow development of American institutions and influence in a community which was essentially French, but which contained a strong British element." - Preface.