Rice, David.  An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky
Rice, David.  An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky
Rice, David.  An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky
Rice, David.  An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky

Rice, David. An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky

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Rice, David; Bishop, Robert H. An Outline of the History of the Church in the State of Kentucky; during a period of forty years containing The Memoirs of Rev. David Rice and Sketches of the Origin and present State of particular Churches, and of the Lives and Labours of a number of men who were eminent and useful in their day. Cincinnati, Ohio: Art Guild Reprints, Inc., 1964.

Facsimile reprint of the original edition from 1824. Gray cloth hardcover, some black smudge marks to the covers, former owner's signature on the fep, 426 clean and unmarked pp., tight. Good. Hardcover.  [3759] 

No. 503 in Roberts’ Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography with Biographical and Historical Notices. “Rich in material on the revival of 1800, this volume has also an important section on David Rice.”

David Rice (1733-1816) b. Hanover County, Va.; d. Green County, Ky. Rev. Rice was a Presbyterian missionary to Kentucky, known by some as “Father Rice,” and remembered as “The Apostle of Kentucky.” He was instrumental in founding Hampton-Sidney College, Translyvania Seminary (now University), and the Danville Theological Seminary. Rice served as a chaplain to the Hanover Militia during the American Revolution and was member of the convention which framed the first constitution of Kentucky. He was the first moderator of both the first Kentucky Presbytery and its first Synod. Educated at Princeton College, Rice then studied under John Todd, and was influenced by Todd and Samuel Davies in his views of slavery. Rice worked for more than twenty years among slaves, and while a member of the Kentucky Constitutional Convention pled for a gradual emancipation. He was a member of the Kentucky Abolition Society and believed that slavery violated not only Christian principles, but also natural law.