De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860
De Bow, J. D. B.    De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860

De Bow, J. D. B. De Bow's Review, Southern Institutions & Literature 1859-1860

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De Bow, J. D. B. [editor].  De Bow's Review and Industrial Resources, Statistics, etc. Devoted to Southern Institutions, Commerce, Agriculture, Manufactures, Internal Improvements, Political Economy, Education, and General Literature. October, 1859 to December, 1860. 15 issues bound in five volumes. New Orleans and Washington City: J. D. B. De Bow, 1859-1860. First Edition.

Five volumes in quarter leather, marbled boards, 5 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches, some surface scuffing to bindings but all sound, tight, with no cracks. Some light dampstaining to end papers, rear end papers of last volume with ink scribbles- also one half of the rfep of this volume torn with loss, last volume also with dampstains in the margins in a few pages. 1,906 total pp., with many pp. of illustrated adverts at the back of each volume. Very good.  [2265]  


All five volumes inscribed "Jno. E. Scruggs, from his affectionate Uncle, W. C. Scott." These evidently in General Scott's hand, one additional inscription in one volume in the hand of Scruggs, in which he adds that his Uncle is from Powhatan, and he from Warrenton. Scott was a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army; Scruggs died in the Union prison at Johnson's Island, 1863.

William Campbell Scott was born in 1809 in Powhatan, VA. He attended Hampden-Sydney College in 1823-1827. Scott graduated from University of Virginia Law School in 1829. He was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates in 1837 and 1851. Scott ran as Know-Nothing candidate in 1856 and was defeated. He was a lawyer in Powhatan County, colonel of the 102nd Virginia Militia Regiment, and brigadier general of the 4th Brigade, 1st Division, Virginia Militia. Scott was a member of the Virginia Secession Convention in 1861. He was appointed colonel of the 44th Virginia Infantry on June 14, 1861. He commanded the 44th during the Valley Campaign. Scott resigned his commission of the 44th on January 14, 1863. Scott died in Powhatan County on April 9, 1865. His papers are preserved by the Library of Virginia.

"John Emmett Scruggs of Powhatan County, Virginia, died in prison at Johnson's Island, 1863. He was editor of a newspaper."  We have not been able to determine why he was imprisoned, nor identify the newspaper. Johnson's Island was initially a prison for Confederate Officers, and his death in 1863 may indicate this. By the end of the war the prison expanded to include all manner of Southern prisoners. His stepson, the son of his wife by her first husband, was John Henry Alexander of Company A., Mosby's Virginia Cavalry, wounded in 1864, survived the war and practiced law in Leesburg.

"De Bow's Review was a widely circulated magazine...in the American South during the upper middle of the nineteenth century, from 1846 until 1884. Before the Civil War, the magazine 'recommended the best practices for wringing profits from slaves.' It bore the name of its first editor, James Dunwoody Brownson DeBow (J. D. B. DeBow) who wrote much in the early issues...By the start of the Civil War, it was the most widely circulated southern periodical. DeBow wrote much of each issue himself...The magazine took an increasingly pro-Southern and eventually secessionist perspective in the late 1850's and early 1850s. It defended slavery in response to abolitionism, published an article in the 1850s that urged the South to resume the African slave trade, and advocated southern nationalism as the Civil War approached." - wikipedia.

The tone and content of these volumes towards the North changes as the year 1860 advances. The sampling of articles below is in chronological order.

Articles in these five volumes include the following: Missionary Failures [the inability to civilize native Africans] "now if the missionaries, instead of feeding and clothing and making presents to the savages, would catch them, enslave them, and put them to constant work, they might speedily and certainly civilize and Christianize them";

Liberia and the Colonization Society; Incidents in the early Settlement of East Tennessee and Knoxville;

Free Negroes in Hayti;

The Union - North and South - Slave Trade and Territorial Questions - Disunion - Southern Confederacy (Nov. 1859 issue);

A Review of Mr. Douglas's Article on Popular Sovereignty;

South Carolina - A Colony and State;

Slave Trade in the Red Sea;

Negroes in a State of Freedom at the North and in England;

Disunion with the Union;

The Basis of Northern Hostility to the South [Envy, Slavery];

Black Republican Success and a Southern Union;

State, Territorial, and Federal Authority;

The Dual Form of Labor [slavery];

Free Negroes in Jamaica;

Slavery Aggressions;

Southern Rights Association of Virginia - Memorial of the Central Southern Rights Association of Virginia: Being a Statement of Grievances and Suggestion of Remedies thereof;

The Manufacture of Arms at the South;

The Designs of Black Republicanism, and the Issues of 1860, in their Consequences to the South, the Constitution, and the Union;

"Squatter Sovereignty" - Popular Sovereignty in the Territories a Fallacy;

Enfranchisement of Southern Commerce: Argument of D. H. London, President of the Southern Rights Association of Virginia;

Negro Preacher in the South;

The Secession of the South and a new Confederation necessary to the Preservation of Constitutional Liberty and Social Morality;

Our School Books "These preliminary remarks have been uttered with especial reference to a subject of the weightiest import to us of the South, and one upon which and every matter connected with it, we cannot be too keenly sensitive. I mean the institution of Negro Slavery";

Free Negro Rule: Free Negroes in Trinidad, British Guiana, the French Colonies, the Danish Colonies, the Mauritius, Peru, Cuba, Mexico, Nova Scotia, Canada, Panama, London, Sierra Leone, and Liberia;

Slavery in Brazil;

Slave Life Preferred by Negroes;

The Effect of Climate on Human Development;

The Conservative Men, and the Union Meetings of the North;

The Irrepressible Conflict and Impending Crisis; Free Negroes in the Northern United States;

The Old African and his Prayer;

The Union Broken, by Dr. Edward Delony, of Louisiana;

Relations of the Negro Race to Civilization;

Amalgamation [mixed race, mulattoes];

Delusions of Fanaticism [abolitionists];

What are we to do? "In view of the Harper Ferry's affair, and the developments which have followed it...What steps are we to take to effectively resist the spirit and the attacks - the actual invasions, of Northern abolitionism?;

Southern Patronage to Southern Imports and Domestic Industry;

Presidential Candidates and Aspirants "Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois. It is creditable to the author of the work before us, that the claims of this personage were regarded as too contemptible to entitle him to a place in the Gallery. Still, by virtue of intrigue and perfidy in some quarters, he finds himself at the head of the Republican hosts...Heaven, upon what times have we fallen, when the seat of Washington is in danger of being occupied by this low and vulgar partisan of John Brown!";

Direct Trade - How to Save the South and the Union;

Peculiarities and Diseases of Negroes;

Unity of the Human Race Disproved by the Hebrew Bible, by Dr. Samuel A. Cartwright;

Cotton and Negroes;

The Ruler and the Ruled: The Right of Human Rule - The Authority of Civil Governments;

The Declaration of Independence and the Republican Party;

Southern Wealth and Northern Profits; Wants of the South;

South Carolina - Her State Sovereignty;

Plantation Life - Duties and Responsibilities;

Personal Liberty Laws in the Free States;

Southern Statesmanship;

The South, in the Union or out of it;

Commercial, Agricultural, and Intellectual Independence of the South, by Daniel H. London;

Nachash Canaan and the Negro Identical;

The South's Power of Self-Protection:

The Right, Duty, and Power, of the Southern States, through Their State Authorities, to protect Their Citizens against Revolution, and the Final Overthrow of Their Institutions;

Fidelity of Slaves;

African Colonization Unveiled;

Dr. Cartwright on the Negro Race;

The South Carolina Mission to Virginia - "embodying the argument made by South Carolina, through her eminent citizen, the Hon. C G. Memminger, at the bar of the Legislature of Virginia, touching the great subject of Southern wrongs, and the proper remedy for them. The argument is powerful, and leaves little to be said in justification of any course the common perils of the South may urge upon her."