Bodman, Poet and Preacher of the Second Great Awakening 1817
Bodman, Poet and Preacher of the Second Great Awakening 1817

Bodman, Poet and Preacher of the Second Great Awakening 1817

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Bodman, Manoah. An Oration on Death, and the Happiness of the Separate State, or the Pleasures of Paradise...&c. [Revival literature]. Williamsburgh, [MA]: Printed by Ephraim Whitman, 1817.

Full leather binding, worn with some surface abrasions but tight and stout, 4 1/2 x 7 inches, recent former owner's signature on the ffep; iv., 300 pp., tight. Old stains in some sections, of varying darkness. Good.  [3308]    $300.00

No. 555 in Roberts, Revival Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. "A very curious work with information found nowhere else." The majority of the work is prose, with 30 pp. of poetry, and smaller poems interspersed within the prose.

Manoah Bodman (1766-1850), a native of Massachusetts; an accomplished poet nicknamed "The Bard of the Berkshires." Some of his pieces are included in American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century, Vol. I. (The Library of America, 1993).

"Manoah Bodman, an important early American poet whose poems have not appeared in over a century and a half. Bodman, considered 'a man of great eccentricity,' regularly delivered orations in New England towns during the Second Great Awakening of the late [eighteenth] century. He published two broadsides, two booklets, and one book, all filled with depictions of verbal communication with visions of various kinds possibly brought about by epileptic seizures. Despite his long-winded, turgid prose, Bodman's poems are curiously modern in their diction. He wrote in an ejaculatory manner not seen in America until Emily Dickinson's work was published seventy-five years later, and more idiomatic than anyone else's in America until nearly the end of the nineteenth century. Bodman's inspiration was far less literary than experiential, providing a link between the work of Edward Taylor and Walt Whitman in the chain of the Transcendentalists." - Barnes & Noble review of a recent work on Bodman's life.

The complete title: An Oration on Death, and the Happiness of the Separate State, or the Pleasures of Paradise, with their probable Changes and Improvements: The last of which is much quoted from the late Dr. Watts, interspersed, however, with divers Poetical Sketches of the Author's, of various measures and metres. Also, An Oration of the Author's, written early in the spring of 1816, on the then present outpourings of the Spirit of God, in New England, and through the world - our missions to Asia - touches on the Millennium, and the dark periods, to the consummation of all things. Also, Four Hymns or Poems of the Author's, on solemn and divine subjects, to wit: - One, on the great mortality of the women and children in Williamsburgh, which took place in the year 1788. - One, a soliloquy, or rather conference between the divine attributes of mercy and justice, relative to the state of fallen man. One, on the joys of heaven, or the happiness of the glorious state. These last two were composed or written in or about the time of the great reformation in the year 1790. - One, written early in the spring of 1816, on the then present reformation, having a retrospective view of the reformation in these parts in the year 1790; it then will pursue much the same track of the last mentioned oration.